How About First Americans First? | Resistance Camps Spread* | Pequot’s Secret History | HUNAP | RUMBLE

America First? How About First Americans First?

Indian Country is now a target and so many Trump supporters are emboldened by an administration that does not know how to say no to those who would trample on constitutional rights.  This will be true for many who run federal agencies, state governments, oil, gas, and coal producers, and the Congress. In their mind: Indian Country has had it too good for too long.  Imagine that.  Native journalist Mark Trahant is keeping track of t-rump HERE

westerman

***

Indigenous-Led Pipeline Resistance Camps Spread Across the U.S.* Direct opposition to fossil fuel extraction projects continues to spread throughout the USA. Resistance camps mirroring the #NoDAPL …

READ: Indigenous-Led Pipeline Resistance Camps Spread Across the U.S.* | Hwaairfan’s Blog

***********

17detectoristalt-superjumboRemarkable for New England! I know Pequot Museum Research Director Kevin Mc Bride (wearing glasses in left photo)! (Top Photo: NY Times)

watch this

He is the first Indigenous student to serve in that role in the organization’s 104-year-old history.

READ: SpearChief-Morris Becomes First Indigenous Student President of Harvard Law School’s Legal Aid Bureau | Harvard University Native American Program (HUNAP)

At Sundance 2017: A World Cinema Documentary Special Jury Award for Masterful Storytelling was presented to: RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked The World

(Directors: Catherine Bainbridge, Alfonso Maiorana) — This powerful documentary about the role of Native Americans in contemporary music history—featuring some of the greatest music stars of our time—exposes a critical missing chapter, revealing how indigenous musicians helped shape the soundtracks of our lives and, through their contributions, influenced popular culture. Cast: Robbie Robertson, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Martin Scorsese, Tony Bennett, Steven Tyler, Iggy Pop.

I just ran into Cherokee poet-historian Ron Welburn last weekend and he didn’t mention he was in this movie – what a humble guy.

Director Alfonso Maiorana, Producer Christina Fon, Filmmaker Chris Eyre, Musician Ricky Medlocke, Rapper Taboo, Executive Producer Ernest Webb, Executive Producer Tim Johnson and Director Catherine Bainbridge attend the World premiere of RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World by Alfonso Maiorana and Catherine Bainbridge, an official selection of the World Cinema Documentary Competition at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. © 2017 Sundance Institute | photo by Abbey Hoekzema.
Director Alfonso Maiorana, Producer Christina Fon, Filmmaker Chris Eyre, Musician Ricky Medlocke, Rapper Taboo, Executive Producer Ernest Webb, Executive Producer Tim Johnson and Director Catherine Bainbridge attend the World premiere of RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World by Alfonso Maiorana and Catherine Bainbridge, an official selection of the World Cinema Documentary Competition at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. © 2017 Sundance Institute | photo by Abbey Hoekzema.
Advertisements

9 INDIGENOUS-MADE FILMS TO PREMIERE AT THE SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL

RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked The World / Canada (Executive Producer: Tim Johnson, Mohawk)  This powerful documentary about the role of Native Americans in contemporary music history—featuring some of the greatest music stars of our time—exposes a critical missing chapter, revealing how Indigenous musicians helped shape the soundtracks of our lives and, through their contributions, influenced popular culture. Category: WORLD CINEMA DOCUMENTARY COMPETITION

READ NOW: 9 INDIGENOUS-MADE FILMS TO PREMIERE AT THE SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL – Native News Online

 

Happy Friday the 13th – hmmm… is it Happy or just Friday the 13th? Hey, I’m always happy to read about new movies:-) xoxox LT

my hero Robert Redford on sundance and more

Democracy Now! broadcasts from Park City, Utah, home of the Sundance Film Festival, the nation’s largest festival for independent cinema. Today, we spend the hour with Robert Redford. He’s well known as an actor, but part and parcel of who he is is an activist. He took his success and leveraged it to promote his real passions: environmental justice, Native American rights and independent filmmaking. Since 1980, through the Sundance Film Festival and the Sundance Institute, Robert Redford has helped independent voices develop their craft — in film, theater and music — and reach new audiences. Redford joins us for a wide-ranging interview about these many roles in his life, on and off screen. [includes rush transcript]

Link: http://www.democracynow.org/2010/1/25/sundance_founder_robert_redford_on_his

Robert Redford in 2009.
Robert Redford in 2009. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Related articles

 

 

 

 

I wonder if Brad Pitt will grow up to be like Bob Redford? They could be father and son…. Lara

“Beasts Of The Southern Wild” Official Trailer (sundance film fest)


http://filmguide.sundance.org/film/120048/beasts_of_the_southern_wild

DIRECTOR: Benh Zeitlin
SCREENWRITERS: Lucy Alibar, Benh Zeitlin
U.S.A., 2011, 91 min, color,

Hushpuppy, an intrepid six-year-old girl, lives with her father, Wink, in "the Bathtub," a southern Delta community at the edge of the world. Wink's tough love prepares her for the unraveling of the universe; for a time when he's no longer there to protect her. When Wink contracts a mysterious illness, nature flies out of whack—temperatures rise, and the ice caps melt, unleashing an army of prehistoric creatures called aurochs. With the waters rising, the aurochs coming, and Wink's health fading, Hushpuppy goes in search of her lost mother.

Hushpuppy is not just the film's heroine; she's its soul. Beasts of the Southern Wild exists entirely in its own universe: mythological, anthropological, folkloric, and apocalyptic. Benh Zeitlin's first feature (a Sundance Institute Feature Film Program project) employs a cast of nonactors—reflecting its grassroots production—to fiercely portray the bond between father and daughter in a world where only the strong survive. Standing defiantly at the end of the world, Hushpuppy affirms the dignity of telling their own story: that they were once there. . .

Award Winner
Grand Jury Prize: US Dramatic
Excellence in Cinematography Award: U.S. Dramatic

Meet Sterlin Harjo

Native filmmaker speaks about career to cHEROKEE pHOENIX

TESINA JACKSON, Reporter

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Native American filmmaker Sterlin Harjo spoke April 10 at Northeastern State University’s 40th annual Symposium on the American Indian about what it’s like to be in the film business.

“It wasn’t until I started getting into American independent film and foreign films when I was in college that I really decided that I wanted to do this,” Harjo said. “Once I figured out that you didn’t have to make movies like Hollywood, you can make movies in your own way and say different things and unique things that really got me excited about doing it.”

Harjo, Seminole and Muscogee Creek, became interested in film during his college years at the University of Oklahoma. In 2004, he was named one of Sundance Institute’s first Annenberg Film Fellows, which is a multiyear program launched to provide filmmakers with financial support and full involvement in Sundance’s professional workshops.

It was after participating in the Sundance Institute’s filmmaker labs that he wrote and directed his first short drama.

“Once I left the Sundance writers lab and directors lab, I decided that I wanted to make a short film before I made a feature length film just because I wanted practice, and so I quickly wrote a short script called ‘Goodnight Irene,’” he said.

It premiered at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival and at other locations across the world such as Australia and Norway. Filmed in Wewoka, it focuses on two young men who have a life-changing encounter with an elder while waiting at an Indian Health Services clinic.

After Harjo wrote and directed “Goodnight Irene” he decided to tackle his first feature film, “Four Sheets to the Wind.” The film premiered at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival and has been screened nationally and internationally.   

“I think the writing is really fun,” Harjo said. “I love working with actors, but directing is a very difficult thing because you feel like you’re just compromising a lot, fixing problems. Problems are always happening. I feel like a directors job is to fix problems and make sure it doesn’t fall off the tracks.”

“Four Sheets to the Wind” is about a Native American boy who finds his father dead beside a bottle of pills. After he fulfills his promise to sink the body in the family pond, the main character starts anew with his sister in Tulsa.

Harjo has written and directed several other films, including “Barking Water,” “Crooked Little Heart,” “Indian Elvis” and “They’re Playing His Song.” Most of his films take place in a Native American setting.

“I think it’s just because of what I grew up with. I’ve written stuff that didn’t have to do with Native Americans, but for the most part it’s the world that I grew up in so I think it’s important you try to write what you know and it just comes natural,” Harjo said.

Harjo has received several awards for his films, including Special Jury Recognition at the Aspen Shorts Festival and Best Oklahoma Film at the Dead Center Film Festival in Oklahoma City.

Today, he works for This Land Press creating short films and documentaries. However, he remembers that when he first started he didn’t have much income but still kept creating films because he knew that’s what he wanted to do.

“There isn’t a lot of money to be made,” he said. “If you’re going to be a filmmaker, don’t expect to make money. Expect to be broke. But if you really want to do it then do it.

“Just go out and make films because the equipment is really cheap,” he added. “Find a way to get equipment or borrow equipment and go out and just start making stuff because the more you practice and make stuff the better you’ll get.”

 

tesina-jackson@cherokee.org

Sundance: Supporting Native Filmmakers

Click here for story: http://colorlines.com/archives/2012/01/sundances_native_filmmakers.html

 

I am a follower of all things Sundance… one of these years, I will attend…Lara