The Power of John Trudell #BlueIndians

john trudell
James “Jimmy” Looks Twice in Thunderheart, played by John Trudell.

 

By Lara Trace (former editor of the Pequot Times 1999-2004)

It happened years ago… but I can still feel myself outside the Pequot Museum on a bench and the wind is really blowing and John is speaking about his album, and latest tour.

I knew I’d have to read what he said a few times after I listened to the tape I made.  John Trudell was deep, so deep, with level upon level of meaning in both his spoken words and lyrics.  I’d hear him, then I’d process more after a second or third listen… I can’t forget what he said about power and responsibility – you’ll read what he said in this interview.  With the next presidential election whirling around us, it’s hard not to feel powerless. But we are not powerless.

You all know John was an great actor. He was unforgettable in the movie THUNDERHEART.  (Top Photo.) I was lucky to interview him more than once.  (I spoke with him at the Honor the Earth powwow in 1999 in Wisconsin.)  John had a fiery spirit yet he was also fragile.  I felt good energy all around him; his strength was palpable.  After he lost his family, everyone wondered how he’d survive that, even years later. I don’t know how any human could survive intact after your entire family was killed by a house fire.  John did.  John mourned deeply and soared above loss.

From my notes, I was glad when Trudell explained how belief (as in religion belief) takes the place of thinking. I jotted in my notes, “Don’t believe – THINK.  We put a whole lot of energy into HOPE and BELIEF and that energy falls into a void and disappears…. You BELIEVE so you don’t have to think…… You HOPE so you don’t have to truly act – it’s a sedation (drug). Nothing changes, religion is brainwashing the consciousness of people desperate to believe…. this just puts the mind in a prison…

“Violence, terror and traumas has defeated tribal belief systems from tribal Europe thru today… and then the traumatized blame themselves….. and the beast continues to get bigger.  The answer is NON-COOPERATION and a clear thinking human being….”  Trudell didn’t waste any words.

The story I’d heard about Trudell (more than once) was he could walk into a group of angry white ranchers full of their prejudice about Indian people and they’d all walk out of the room with their arms over each others shoulders.  That was John.

Here’s what I wrote up back in 2000…

 

Trudell kicks off Pequot Museum concert series

Poet, activist, prophet, American Indian Movement (AIM) founder, actor and recording artist John Trudell (Santee), made a concert stop with his band Bad Dog, at the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center in May (2000).

Trudell uses words as medicine, so his political and poetic abilities created the new album Blue Indians, on Dangerous Discs records, released in 1999, his ninth album, produced by Jackson Browne.

“I called the album Blue Indians because there is a kind of spiritual and cultural genocide perpetrated on everyone that is poor in this country,” Trudell said. “The advance of technology has put all of us on a kind of reservation.  These are the people who can’t educate their children, or afford health care. They’ve been robbed of life, which is what happened to Native people, so in that context, we’re all Indians.”

The “spoken word” artist said he didn’t set out to be a poet or writer.  After an unspeakable tragedy took the lives of his wife, Tina, their three children and Tina’s mother, back in 1979, he started writing.  The fire that killed them was declared an accident by the FBI who declined to investigate.  This happened just 12 hours after a group marched to FBI headquarters in Wash. DC, where Trudell delivered an address on the FBI’s war against Native Americans.  He burned an American flag in protest of racism and class injustice.  To this day, Trudell believes government operatives set the blaze, “It was murder. They were murdered as an act of war.”  [READ MORE ABOUT TINA]

After 1971, Native men and women formed the national American Indian Movement, in response to the horrific conditions on reservations and the many unsolved murders.  Trudell served as National AIM Chairman from 1973-79.  During that time the FBI compiled a 17,000 page file (covering Trudell’s activities from 1969-80).

Of some 60 pages obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, describing Trudell as a major threat to national security, the memo said, “Extremely eloquent – therefore extremely dangerous.”

Writing has helped Trudell keep some sanity and continue to survive.  In 1981, he published a book of poetry “Living in Reality” and by 1982 combined music and poetry, with the help of his musician friends Jackson Browne and future collaborator Jesse Ed Davis, a Kiowa from Oklahoma.

When asked how he deals with anger, Trudell told one reviewer, “I look at it as healthy.  It’s like sadness.  There’s a reason we’re given certain feelings. I think anger is necessary to our survival and reality, but now we live in a technology reality where people are programmed not to accept their anger.  I think we can use it as fuel for clarity, focus and accomplishment.  Anger doesn’t have to be a distorting experience.”

In May, the band played songs from the album Blue Indians, while Trudell spoke his poetic lyrics.  About promoting the album, he said later, “We don’t tour like other bands.  We hit the road sometimes for a week, or several weeks.  It’s more practical for us.”

I met John at LCO in 1999
I met John at LCO in 1999 and he signed it!

In concert, Trudell referred to humans as being mined, like resources, such as minerals, and reminded us we are indeed composed of the earth’s materials.  After the concert, he explained the effects of mining humans, “The feeling of powerlessness that this society has, I think is a result of mining humans because the people do feel powerless.  I think no clear, coherent thinking people, would accept as normal the conditions that they have to accept.  So, the only reason I can see that people would accept the inequities, are because they feel powerless to deal with them.  The powerlessness may disguise itself as rage, or racial hatred, or sexism, it may disguise itself in many ways, but basically the common thread is a feeling of powerlessness among the people.

“That means all the aggressive attitudes basically get internalized.  I think that’s the obvious result of being mined as an individual.  If they are being real with themselves, no pretending, no justification or rationalization, how many people feel that they have any real power?

“How many people feel powerless to deal with situations put in their life?  It’s got to do with perceptional reality.  If you use our intelligence as clearly and coherently as we can, I think we’d understand that we are not necessarily powerless.  But we don’t know how to relate to power, or recognize it, therefore we don’t know how to exercise it.”

And, Trudell said we can’t accept this idea of being mined because we can’t recognize it or see it.

“We’re not taught about our personal relationship to power.  We’re not taught about our relationship to the Great Spirit.  Recognizing power is what you have to do.  When you recognize it, you exercise it.

“You can’t take back what they have already taken but you can stop the taking of your power, once you recognize it.”

On the importance of prayer, John said he prays for balance.  “Prayer is often a misused word.  There are people who pray for things to make them happy so I don’t know if they’re really praying.  Then there are people who pray for the welfare of others.  Some people don’t pray so much for their own individualized ego, but understand that prayer is a way of thinking in harmony with the Creator.  Praying is a way of participating with the Creator.

“Prayer that is based upon thought and feeling, then that prayer is participating.  Prayer that is based upon need and emotion, that prayer is not participating in a synchronized manner, because it’s based on the ego’s need and emotion.”

“Responsibility is the way to fulfillment, when one recognizes and exercises their responsibility, this is how one is to be free.  It’s a way of reconnecting with power for us as humans.”

On his own life, Trudell said, “I see as clearly as I can. The objective is for me to be as real to myself as I can possibly be.  The more real I can be to myself, the more real maybe I can be to other people.  It’s a challenge.”

(Published in the Pequot Times.)

trudell truth trudell_no sense

 

We lost John in 2015.

Indian Country Today on John Trudell Legacy

This entire post is relevant to this quote:

Clarke quote

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Native Americans in newsrooms #NativeLivesMatter

“It is no secret that Washington faces a serious debt problem, but last time I checked, it was not because we are spending too much on Indian housing, healthcare or education.  It is not because we are spending too much on addressing the scourge of diabetes in Native communities, improving crumbling infrastructure or creating jobs in Indian Country.  It is not because we are spending too much supporting Native American veterans who put their lives on the line to defend our nation, or creating economic opportunities for Indian youth. It is profoundly hypocritical that the United States, year-after-year, decade-after-decade, does so little to honor its trust responsibilities to Native peoples.  It’s time for real change.” – Bernie Sanders READ MORE

 

By Lara Trace (Independent Voter)

The above quote is from Bernie Sander’s website on his stance on our government’s trust responsibilities to tribes.  Bad thing is: most people don’t even know or care that tribes exist in 2016.

I’ve mentioned on this blog I worked at News From Indian Country (1996-1999).  When I started working as a journalist, there were just two Native American-owned-operated national print newspapers. TWO!  (There are still two and more online news outlets now*.)  At that time, in the mid 90s, I was one of 350+ Native journalists and a member of Native American Journalists Association (NAJA). Very few of my friends worked at a mainstream newspaper like USA TODAY or the New York Times.  I knew two Native men (John and Charlie) who held those prestigious jobs and neither are writing for those newspapers in 2016.

By Source (WP:NFCC#4), Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37491489
Minnie Two Shoes, By Source (WP:NFCC#4), Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37491489

I recall when my Assiniboine Sioux friend Minnie Two Shoes did a brief stint as a journalist at the Duluth News Tribune.  We worked together at News From Indian Country (NFIC).  Minnie helped found the Native American Press Association in 1984, which became the Native American Journalists Association in 1990. She edited two magazines: Native Peoples and Aboriginal Voices when I knew her.  I drove Minnie to the hospital in Hayward when it was first discovered she had breast cancer.Minnie Two Shoes died in Minneapolis, Minnesota on April 9, 2010 after battling cancer.[9]

Minnie was among the leaders and founders of the American Indian Movement. Yep, those warriors like John Trudell!

Minnie, John Trudell and Paul DeMain, founder of NFIC, made an indelible impact on me.  I credit them for teaching me crucial things I could never learn from books or in a classroom.   I met many fantastic Native journalists when I belonged to NAJA over the years.  (NAJA AWARDS 2002) And I admit it was their influence that I am a publisher now at Blue Hand Books because the majority of journalists I know (and knew) are also great writers writing great books, not just news articles for tribal newspapers.

Now imagine this: The population of Indian Country in 2010 was 2,553,566.  That number is growing.  It’s not a huge population but it is noteworthy in the respect that state by state, very little is taught about Native people, or our history, or our ancestral territory or treaty rights, which can breed contempt among non-Indians, and even worse, breed racism.  When I traveled to Pine Ridge in the early 90s, I was told South Dakota citizens were known and feared for their racism toward tribes—to me that was appalling, unreasonable and actually very dangerous.  At one time it was said that Canada was more racist but that depends on who you’re talking to… This kind of hate is like a virus that spreads from one generation to another.  The American Indian Movement was instrumental is bringing awareness of hate crimes and many unsolved murders happening in the 1970s involving Indians being killed by non-Indians across the USA.

If more non-Indian people understood history, it would definitely transform and diminish these hateful attitudes.  With good consistent writing about tribes in mainstream newspapers, then perspective could shift attitudes and create unity and respect, which is sadly and sorely lacking today.

 

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I posted here about my time in Pine Ridge and interviewing Leonard Peltier and John Trudell.  And I mentioned how I found out that my relative’s nephew Allen Locke was murdered by police.

*FMI: NativeWeb Resources: Newspapers – Native & Indigenous

National Native News daily podcast:  HERE

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The following story is KEY to any discussion about Native Americans in news rooms and across Indian County. We need good stories and websites and newspapers who give accurate reporting and reflect the truth.

Police kill Native Americans at almost the same rate as African-Americans, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Between 1999 and 2013, an average of .29 per 100,000 Native Americans were killed by police, compared to .3 per 100,000 for blacks and .11 per 100,000 for whites. “America should be aware of this,” argues Chase Iron Eyes, a lawyer and a leader of the Lakota People’s Law Project, which runs a publicity campaign called Native Lives Matter. But for the most part, America is not aware of this.

That may be changing, albeit slowly, as both mainstream media and Native American-run digital outlets begin to cover American Indian issues more robustly.

“We’re not necessarily focusing on the shadows and the sadness,” says Jason Begay, a Navajo who grew up on a reservation and runs the Native News Project, “but on how people are persevering.”

Tristan Ahtone, a member of the Kiowa tribe of Oklahoma who often reported for Al Jazeera America, won a following among Native Americans and others for writing about new topics, such as how one tribe is invoking treaty rights to stop another oil pipeline, the rethinking of the militant American Indian Movement that grew up alongside the Black Panthers in the 1960s, and an international indigenous basketball tournament. His approach: “Stop looking at Indian Country as a foreign place with foreign people doing foreign things. It keeps us apart from each other, and reinforces the idea that these people are different, that they’re victims, that they’re helpless. They get covered when there’s doom, gloom, or there’s blood. The cumulative effect is that you’ve got communities that are isolated from the rest of the country and generally distrustful of journalists, and that just creates a continuing cycle.”

Ahtone is one of only a handful of Native American journalists. There are 118 self-identified Indian journalists working at U.S. daily newspapers, according to 2015 data from the American Society of News Editors. That’s .36 percent of all U.S. newsroom employees.  Native American activists say there need to be more newsroom internships and training programs for aspiring Native American journalists.

READ ON…

And I’ll leave you with this quote about diversity in writing and publishing:

“You will be tokenized. Even when you get to write about your own experience of being a minority in America—you know, even that can be turned against you. Are you going to be used later on as leverage against an accusation of racism? Will you then be seen as a collaborator? In most cases the answer is yes….

“Hiring is a crucial step, but it is reformist. It’s not going to really fix anything, just sand off the rough edges, right? Because there is far more concern about appearing racist rather than not doing racist things. It’s not just a publishing thing. What else can I say but dismantle capitalism? And I don’t know that anything radical enough to do that wouldn’t hurt a lot of the people that we are trying to save. Barring world historical change, I don’t see really anything happening but a new paint job. It is systemic racism for a reason, it’s so essentially wound up with the system upon which everything is built.  You can ameliorate it.  You can palliate it.  But you can’t cure it.  This is what I sound like when I’m optimistic.” —Tony Tulathimutte, novelist, Private Citizens

READ MORE (top graphic)

My writing on this blog (and publishing new books here) is my humble attempt to broaden perspectives about Indigenous People/American Indians/First Nations… Thank you all for reading and following this blog! You matter to me! xoxoxo

 

A Loss to the World: A tribute to John Trudell

By Lara/Trace

We were away when I heard the news that John Trudell passed.  I had the honor of meeting him and interviewing him more than once. All I could think was:

“It’s a loss to the world….”

I will be writing more about John in an upcoming post but read these moving tributes… If you didn’t know about JT, you will now…

Here’s a recap about John from the NAMMY’s:

Our beloved Brother, Father, Uncle, Grandfather and Friend made the journey to the ancestors at 2:20 am this morning December 8, 2015.  He was in the arms of Johnny Elk, Havoni Coupe, and Kevin Marsh.  We are deeply grateful for all your prayers, love and support.  May our beloved’s words, work on behalf of our people, Mother Earth, all relations and His journey bring you peace in your life, as he loves all of you so very much.
Peace and Love Relatives.
On John Trudell’s Facebook page it states: My ride showed up. Celebrate Love.  Celebrate Life.  John Trudell
February 15, 1946 – December 8, 2015

 

John Trudell was a poet, recording artist, actor and speaker whose global following reflected the universal language of his words, work and message. He was presented with a Living Legend award at the Inaugural Native American Music Awards in 1998 which he called “Heart Medicine”. Throughout the years, he appeared as a special guest participant and took the Artist of the Year award in 2000 and the Song/Single of the Year for his full length recording Blue Indians with Quiltman & Jackson Browne. 

According to the Associated Press, a trustee of Trudell’s estate, Cree Miller, confirmed John Trudell died of cancer on Tuesday morning, December 8th at his home in Santa Clara County in Northern California surrounded by family and friends. He was 69 years of age.

Born February 15, 1946, in Omaha, Nebraska to a Santee Sioux father and Mexican mother, John Trudell grew up near the Santee Sioux Reservation. He became involved in Native American activism after serving in the U.S. Navy on a destroyer off the Vietnamese coast.

In 1969, Trudell joined American Indians who had occupied Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay to demand that the former federal prison should be given to Native Americans under treaty rights. John, who studied radio and broadcasting at a college in San Bernardino, California, became spokesman for the group that called itself the United Indians of All Tribes, and ran a radio broadcast from the island called Radio Free Alcatraz during the 19-month takeover.

John went on to serve as national chairman of the activist American Indian Movement from 1973 to 1979. While he was demonstrating in Washington, D.C. in 1979, his pregnant wife, Tina Manning, their three children and mother-in-law were killed in a fire at her parents’ home. After the tragedy, John was compelled to write poetry. He said it just came to him, like Tina was talking to him and he was just “following the lines.”

He published a chapbook in 1982 entitled, Living in Reality. That same year he began recording his poetry to traditional Native music by talking his friend Quiltman into backing him on drum and vocals. By 1983, he released his debut album Tribal Voice on his own Peace Company label.  His relationship with Jackson Browne led him to other supporters like Kris Kristofferson, Bonnie Raitt, Indigo Girls, John Fogerty, Willie Nelson, and Bob Dylan.

In 1986, the late legendary Kiowa guitarist, Jesse Ed Davis came up to him and said, “I can turn your poems into songs.” Together, they recorded three albums. Their first, AKA Graffiti Man, was released in 1986, and dubbed the “best album of the year” by Bob Dylan. AKA Graffiti Man served early notice of Trudell’s “singular ability to express fundamental truths” through a unique mix of poetry, Native music, blues and rock. It was followed by But This Isn’t El Salavdor and Heart Jump Bouquet, both released in 1987.

Kelly Ed Davis, wife of the late Jesse Ed Davis spoke of the incredible connection between John and Jesse in a documentary entitled, Trudell; “Immediately they were like brothers.  They shared a common understanding of what it is to be an Indian in America. The work he (Jesse) did with John was some of the best work he ever did. That connection will go on throughout eternity.”

Despite Jesse Ed Davis’ untimely death in 1988, John Trudell would go on to release a total of fourteen albums, eight with his band, Bad Dog.

John with members of Bad Dog

Fables and Other Realities was released in 1991 featuring a collaboration with Mark Shark who would remain a consistent member of Bad Dog, Trudell remade and re-released A.K.A Grafitti Man which was originally on tape, as an audio CD. In 1992, he also released Children of the Earth: Child’s Voice. His 1994 album Johnny Damas & Me was critically acclaimed as “a culmination of years of poetic work, fusing traditional sounds, values, and sensibilities with thought-provoking lyrics, and urgent rock and roll.”

In 1998, John Trudell was honored as a Living Legend at the Inaugural Native American Music Awards which he called it, heart medicine. His other musical releases included; the multiple Native American Music Award-winning, Blue Indians (1999), the all spoken word effort, JT – Descendant Now Ancestor (2001) which he performed at the 8th Annual Native American Music Awards VIP party, Bone Days which was which was produced by actress Angelina Jolie (2002),  John Trudell & Bad Dog Live à Fip, a rare live album recorded in Paris, France (2005), the double album, Madness and Moremes (2007), Crazier Than Hell (2010), and Through the Dust (2014).

Little Steven, Rita Coolidge and John

His latest album entitled, Wazi’s Dream, was just released in 2015. John called it, “a mixing of poetry and singing and music.” It was recently reported that John also collaborated with other groups including; A Tribe Called Red, and a band called The Pines.  “Bad Dog is who I really work with” he said, “but I’ve gotten some opportunities to work with different artists, because I enjoy it. Anytime I can get this stuff out there, put to music, I enjoy it.”

John has authored three books of poetry. The 1999 release of Stickman: Poems, Lyrics, Talks edited by Paola Igliori brought international attention. His most recent book, called Lines from a Mined Mind, is a collection of his album lyrics over the decades and is currently a #1 Best Seller on Amazon.com.

John’s many celebrity fans and friends included; Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne, Bob Dylan, Kris Kristofferson, who paid tribute to Trudell with the 1995 song “Johnny Lobo,” a tune Kristofferson still frequently performs live and Marcheline Bertrand, Angelina Jolie’s mother, who John partnered with as she dealt with cancer, which she succumbed to in 2007. Marcheline and Angelina also executive produced the 2005 documentary, Trudell,  with Heather Rae. Click the link for the .Trudell Documentary

Trudell also played roles in a number of features films and made for television films, including 1992’s Thunderheart  with Val Kilmer and 1998’s Smoke Signals with Adam Beach.

In 2012, Trudell became the creator of Hempstead Project Heart (Hemp Energies Alternative Resource Technologies), a national initiative that creates awareness of the many uses of hemp as way of establishing a green economy in America.

When it had first been reported that John was battling cancer, many reached out to express their love and appreciation. He responded back to them saying;

“I appreciate all of your expressions of concern and I appreciate all of your expressions of love. It has been like a fire to my heart. Thank you all for that fire.

John Trudell and his family ask for people to celebrate love and celebrate life. He asked that people pray and celebrate in their own way in their own communities.

“I don’t want to tell people how to remember me. I want people to remember me as they remember me.

So we are to remember John as we remember him.

Here are some remembrances now circulating:
Remembering John“I was very saddened to hear of his death this morning and will always cherish the few brief times I got to spend with him. He was a very down to earth, inspiring and amazing man.” 
Shyanne Chulyin Ch’ivaya Beatty
Network Manager at Native Voice 1 (NV1)
He helped spark a spoken word movement that is a continuation of Native American oral traditions…To define his voice and presence, words like empowering, authentic, intelligent, inspirational and necessary. He believed in the Spoken Word, that it had power.
Alex Jacobs
Indian Country Today Media Network 
I honor and thank this man for his words that changed my life as he embarks upon his journey home to be with our creator.
Lance A. Gumbs
Area Vice-President Northeast Region
National Congress of the American Indian
To John Trudell, my dear old friend and mentor of 30 years ago.
May your journey to the Creator be filled with beautiful memories
and insights of all those lives you touched.
With love always
,

Joanne & Leah Shenandoah and Doug George
We lost a great Warrior today. My prayers are with the Trudell family in these hard times.  Heart is hurting but he is at peace. Ba-ma-mi-naa until we meet again
Buggin Malone/Musician 
He was a hero to me and many others.
Jennifer Elizabeth Kreisberg
Thanking him & his family for their unselfish gift. All Nations loved him because he loved them. A warrior, Leader, Brother & Friend to all.
Beaded Wing
Today the thunderbirds took one of the greats home to watch over his people.
Rest in Paradise 

Joey Stylez/Musician
It was an honor to have had the time to visit with him and stand with the Trudell family and be there through this time. John wanted the world to know he is not dead he’s simply transformed energies and dimensions.
Thank you John!

Cody Thomas Blackbirdand from NAMA…A true leader. A fearless warrior. A master philosopher and a prophetic poet, unmatched, unequivocal and inimatible. We will miss his smile, his humble presence, and his profound greatness. He was an integral part of the Native American Music Awards since its inception and before.  Thankfully, he has left us with his extraordinary gifts of music and words that will remain in our hearts and minds forever.
Ellen Bello
President, Native American Music Awards

Joanne Shenandoah, Ellen Bello and John Trudell at the First Awards Show

My earlier post about John Trudell

VIDEO

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Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/print/2015/12/16/honor-lines-jt-162781
 
+++ and I have a new Facebook author page for all my blog posts: https://www.facebook.com/tracehentz/

Remembering Tina Manning-Trudell (Paiute-Shoshone)


PHOTO: Tina Manning (left) John Trudell and their children

Tina Manning-Trudell was a Paiute-Shoshone water rights activist and wife of John Trudell, Chairman of the American Indian Movement.

Manning was the daughter of Arthur and Leah Hicks Manning. Her father had served as the tribal chairman of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation. She attended the University of Tulsa, where first she met John Trudell.

She was killed, along with her unborn baby (Josiah Hawk), three other children – Ricarda Star, Sunshine Karma, and Eli Changing Sun – and her mother in an arson attack on the Duck Valley Indian Reservation in northern Nevada on 12 February 1979. Her father survived the fire but was badly burned. The attack took place less than 12 hours after John Trudell had delivered a speech in front of FBI headquarters during which he burned a United States flag.

On February 12, 1979, Trudell lost his wife, Tina Manning and their three children, and his mother-in-law Leah Hicks-Manning in a suspicious fire at the home of his parents-in-law on the Duck Valley Indian Reservation in Nevada. His father-in-law Arthur Manning survived. He was a member of the Duckwater Shoshone Tribe‘s tribal council who was working for treaty rights. Opponents included the local tribal police chief and the BIA superintendent, John Artichoker. Leah coordinated social services at the reservation. Tina had been working for tribal water rights at the Wildhorse Reservoir. Opponents of her campaign included officials of the local BIA, Elko County and Nevada state officials, members of the water recreation industry, and local European-American ranchers.[5] Other activists have also speculated whether there was government involvement behind the tragedy.[6]

Source: wikipedia

FOOTNOTE: What happened to John’s family, their murder was never investigated by the government. No one was ever prosecuted.  I met and interviewed John a few times and I do know that many in the American Indian Movement (AIM) were targeted by CO-INTEL PRO – and to kill his family would have dis-empowered the movement, to destroy John, to create fear, all to break him. They did break him (and other Indians) but not in the way you might think.  I will continue to cover history on this blog as well as adoption trafficking…. Lara/Trace

John Trudell (#OWS)

trudell on identity

http://youtu.be/UwsSvtZetlo