Defying US Borders, Asserting Territorial Rights | Bad Movies | Children Strike | Wayfarers and The Fork in the Road

We didn’t cross the border, the border crossed us.” That’s the message from communities who live with the troubled legacy of colonialism today—the descendants of Native peoples who have survived in defiance of the national divides that strafe their lands and run counter to their cultural inheritance.

Such a move, (THE WALL) according to the resolution, would threaten territorial rights, “further divide historic tribal lands and communities,” “militarize the lands on the southern boundary,” and “disturb or destroy tribal archeological, sacred sites, and human remains.”

READ: Defying US Borders, Native Americans Are Asserting Their Territorial Rights | The Nation

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BAD MOVIES? A final, crucial step to being a responsible media consumer is to look for works made by Indigenous artists or in collaboration with Indigenous artists.

GOOD READ: Native American Stereotypes in Popular Media – SAPIENS

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For her 16th birthday, Maddy Fernands asked her parents for an unusual gift: to switch the family to wind power.  She didn’t want an iPhone, new clothes or — banish the thought — a car.  Cars and trucks account for about a fifth of greenhouse gas emissions, and a significant amount of Fernands’s climate anxiety. “Sometimes we’ll be stuck in traffic and I’ll look outside and watch the exhaust coming out of the car in front of me and I’ll freak out,” she told me. “I feel so powerless to stop it.” Fernands has been struggling with that sense of helplessness since she first became keyed into the accelerating timetable of climate change in seventh grade. “It seemed like the end of the world,” she said. “But the apocalyptic message wasn’t being broadcast. Nobody was taking correct action to put us on a path away from climate catastrophe.” Because her parents and teachers didn’t seem to share her urgency, Fernands decided that she herself would have to sound the alarm over climate.

Climate change is causing mental anguish in people of all ages, according to Lise Van Susteren, a psychiatrist and member of the Climate Psychiatry Alliance. “When you’re hearing day in and day out that we’ve got 12 years, we’ve got 11 years, the oceans are collapsing, fires are burning, air quality is terrible, wear a mask, the anxiety is inescapable,” said Van Susteren.

READ: Young People Feel Betrayed by Adults Over the Climate Crisis. Today, They’re Going on Strike.

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Turn at fork in the road

book review: Truly prolific writer poet community organizer

By LT

J Glenn’s visionary fiction novel Wayfarers – Where No One Is an Outcast is about an interesting mix of homeless people who want to help other homeless people. Do we need it? Timely? Absolutely.

Right to the end of his fiction novel, suspense abounds.

In real life: There are always two groups of people: the Have’s and the Have Not’s.  Can there be a Happy Ending?  The brilliant idea from Wayfarers story leads the author to buy land in Oklahoma for this very purpose: a farm where the homeless can resettle in 2019.  I interviewed the author in Jan. 2015.

J Glenn is an elder, a man of vision and great wisdom. He is a good friend and a true inspiration. He has shared his ideas on this blog HERE HERE

FORK IN THE ROAD

WEWOKA, OKLAHOMA — He arrived at this latest fork in the road pretty late.

Glenn Evans is 88 now but excited about what he calls his last hurrah, an idea he would like to try out on this plot of land.

A visitor asks, “Why in the world would you want to leave Washington State, one of the gardens spots of the U.S. to here?”

Evans makes a circle with his finger beside his head and chuckles, “I’m a little nuts.”

He grew up on a farm near Wewoka where most of his family’s food needs were met with a big garden.

Glenn’s family moved to town though.

On a walk through tall weeds on his new land, his guest asks, “Are we bushwhacking your trail?”

Evans says, “No we’re just starting one. We’re pioneers!”

He went off to school and chased success as a stock broker.

He left that and turned to a career in writing.

Several books in he wrote a novel called ‘Wayfarers‘ about a group of homeless people who want to help other homeless people.

His thoughts while writing, “I want to do something for people. Create a place where they can live together as a family.”

Evans started walking around and thinking what worked in fiction might work in real life.

“I wanted to make my first place right here in Oklahoma,” he says.

So here’s his new idea.

Invite people, maybe homeless, he’s not sure, to open up this acreage to folks who want to grow their own food, who want to live off their gardens like his family did.

“Food and shelter, and you’re part of a family,” he suggests.

They use no till farming methods, plant some fruit trees, and live in underground houses to stay cool in the summer, warm in winter, and safe in the spring.

Of living underground, Evans says, “It’s good for tornadoes.”

It took him a couple of hours to walk through the brush and get a good gauge on the property.

The only road on it leads to a pump jack, but J. Glenn sees a successful future here.

“Is the land good,” asks his visitor?

“Oh. I think it’s good and rich,” he responds. Look at the soil. It’s had years of composting.”

Call him a visionary, or call him a crazy old man.

Glenn Evans just needs a few more crazy people like him to unplug and dig in, to make this fork in the road a little bit wider.

Glenn currently makes his home in Olympia, Washington.

VIDEO: https://kfor.com/2018/07/20/he-grew-up-on-a-farm-at-88-j-glenn-evans-hopes-he-can-lure-people-back/

To learn more about his work go to http://www.poetswest.com

Book Description: Wayfarers

From Seattle and the Pacific Northwest, this picaresque novel takes on the issues of homelessness, big city corruption, and corporate greed. An engaging, rollicking tale of those who are mostly down on their luck and chafe under the rules and regulations imposed by those in authority.  They were small in numbers, inexperienced, and some of them uneducated but they made up for it in a passionate belief in themselves.  Wayfarers is an adventure story about a homeless half Cherokee who sets out to do something for the homeless with the help of such characters as a prostitute, a disbarred lawyer, a cuckolded preacher turned prospector, ex-CIA man, a veteran turned warrior for the good and a small Indian tribe. The two main protagonists, RB (Chief) and Warrior, each has his own way to bring justice into the world: one that allows the Native American culture to nourish and restore health to the planet. The other protagonist, Warrior, has a strong sense of justice laced with a mission to punish the evil-doers. Against this backdrop are the greedy power-brokers hell-bent on imposing their views on society. What will be the final outcome and whose philosophy will be the winner? A regenerative culture vs the competitive materialistic one? The wayfarers seek to provide alternatives to living on the street or to incarceration. There is a wisdom of indigenous peoples that we can use to help put our post-industrial society on a more ecological basis. Laced with the honesty of Steinbeck – both religious and profane, dangerous and divine – this pot boiler keeps rolling to the finish line.

I can’t wait to visit the Glenn Kay Evans Farms

LT

p.s. I had a very good check up in February and see my doctors again in May – my one year cancer anniversary.  Thank you all for the good thoughts and prayers and kind words. I’m doing GREAT!

Blog Bonus: Emvpanyv: One who tells a story | hanging re-enactment | Go Fighting Hamsters! | Trump Termination

Emvpanyv: One who tells a story (MNN File Photo)

Editorial – “Go Fighting Hamsters!” Gary Fife, Radio Communications Specialist

Editor’s Note: The following column contains strong language.

OKMULGEE, Okla.— Ever notice the phrase “federally recognized tribes” when it comes to identifying who is and who isn’t an Indian. If your tribe is not on the list, published by the BIA— (some say ‘Boss Indians Around’) in the Federal Register, then it could mean the differences between receiving services or not, funding or not, having a CDIB (Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood) card or even entering art shows.

Well, the BIA finally got around to publishing that list, like they’re supposed to according to law.  567.  That’s the number of tribes having this political (political, not racial) relationship with the U.S. government.  Now, if you are wondering where all these tribes are, a good many of them are Alaska Native Villages, recognized as local units of government—tribes.  From the Absentee Shawnee of Oklahoma, to the Yupiit of Andreafski in Alaska, to the Zuni Tribe of New Mexico, we’re all good Indians, right?

Here’s what the feds said: “This notice publishes the current list of 567 tribal entities recognized and eligible for funding and services from the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) by virtue of their status as Indian Tribes.  The list is updated from the notice published on May 4, 2016 (81 FR 26826).” And…if just have to see for yourself:

Publication Date: 01/17/2017

Agencies: Bureau of Indian Affairs

Document Type: Notice

Document Citation: 82 FR 4915

Page: 4915-4920 (6 pages)

Agency/Docket Number: 178A2100DD/AAKC001030/A0A501010.999900253G (that’s a long one, huh?)

Document Number: 2017-00912

I guess if your tribe ain’t on it, you’re outta luck.

The emotional battle of an Indian child’s parental custody like Baby Veronica won’t be repeated, according to national news sources.  Recently, the U.S. Supreme Court turned down an effort to hear a case involving a Native American girl who was ordered removed from a California foster home and reunited with relatives in Utah. “Lexi,” who is part Choctaw, was 6-years-old when she was taken from her foster home near Los Angeles under terms of the Indian Child Welfare Act.

From the “I Can’t Believe This Happened” category:

“Public hanging of Native man re-enactment sparks outrage.”

The Historical Society of Hanna’s Town, Pennsylvania actors performed a public execution re-enactment of the hanging of Mamachtaga to an enthusiastic crowd.

‘Indian Country Today’ reported Jan. 7, the Westmoreland County Historical Society re-enacted the 1785 public hanging of the Native man at the town.

The Indian news outlet reported for the first time in the society’s history, the celebration coordinators chose to re-enact a public hanging, this time of Mamachtaga, a Delaware man convicted of murder in 1785.  A video of the public hanging was posted on YouTube June 26, 2016.  The video shows several children in the audience watching as men dressed in colonial dress hang a red-face painted ‘Mamachtaga.’ Several people, presumably re-enactors, shouted comments such as, “Dirty no good Indian deserves to be hung,” and “Murderers, that’s all that they are.”

Several people expressed outrage over the video in Facebook comments. “This is horrible,” commented one. “What is wrong with people? Letting their kids watch this s***! Nothing like family bigotry,” was also commented.

Many people have contacted both the Westmoreland County Historical Society and the volunteer group who participated in the re-enactment to let them know of their opposition to such depictions. ‘Indian Country Today’ says, “According to them, the issue of race did not enter into the re-enactment.  Asked if the group would have done a similar performance if the criminal had been African American they said, ‘Yes.’ “Although the matter is under discussion, the committee doubted that the hanging would be included in next year’s Frontier Court Re-enactment Days celebrations.

Let’s hope not or what? The public hanging of Native men is still a spectator sport?

Let’s change the subject and mood.

Remember last year when I mentioned that a ritzy East Coast college was changing its mascot? “Lord Jeff” had been the mascot for Amherst College in Massachusetts. In the 1700s, he was the guy that suggested using smallpox infected blankets on the local Native people to get rid of them.  The national mood to change sports team’s mascots motivated the school to make the change and several new ideas came to mind.  The Amherst Facebook page reported in December a big list of names was submitted, and then pared down to about 30.  One of them (and my favorite) was the ‘Hamsters.’

Could you imagine at some athletic competition when the team makes its appearance, it’s led by a squad of beautiful ‘Hamster-ette’ cheerleaders and they come out of a big HabiTrail plastic tube?

Nibble em’, nibble em’. Go Fighting Hamsters!

Tafvmpuce! Wild onion season’s not too far off! Ready for the dinners?

Hompvks Ce.

Source: Emvpanyv: One who tells a story – Mvskoke Media

[Shortly after the posting of this article on Indian Country Today, the original video noted in this story was taken off of YouTube due to the public outcry.  Also, Chief Chester L. Brooks  of the Delaware Tribe of Indians located in Bartlesville, OK issued a strongly worded request for the video to be taken down, and the letter, which demanded immediate action from the Westmoreland County Historical Society of Pennsylvania to stop the reenactment, and expressed the tribe’s outrage that the historical society would go beyond the bounds of decency, also demanded an apology and that the removal of the video should be completed within ten days. READ THIS ENTIRE ARTICLE.]

List of sports team names and mascots derived from indigenous People …

Colleges and universities

Secondary schools

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Federally recognized tribes should brace for possible termination policy under Trump

Whether we like it or not, Saglutupiaġataq (“the compulsive liar” in Iñupiatun) is now president of the United States and Republicans control Congress. Federally recognized Alaska Native and American Indian tribes should brace for the worst, including the possibility that Congress may move to terminate federally recognized tribes.

https://sokokisojourn.wordpress.com/2017/03/24/federally-recognized-tribes-should-brace-for-possible-termination-policy-under-trump/comment-page-1/#comment-436