Vermont’s Uncomfortable Eugenics History | #ICWA Custody Case | Dawnland | Paradise Papers | #NAAM

Vermont’s Uncomfortable Eugenics History

Read the full article by Stephen Mills in the Rutland Herald.

Dormancy Concept Trailer from Luke Becker-Lowe on Vimeo.

Link to the GoFundMe site for this production.

via Filmmakers Explore Vermont’s Uncomfortable Eugenics History

My earlier post on this

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The Supreme Court refused to hear an Arizona case that pitted a non-Indian mother and Indian father each other in a fight over custody of their children.

READ: Supreme Court won’t hear Arizona case on custody fight over tribal kids | Cronkite News

***

“Dawnland,” an upcoming documentary film, follows the stories of several key individuals involved in the Maine Wabanaki-State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

READ: The Wabanaki people are taking back their narrative | Public Radio International

***Offshore Billionaires (If they don’t pay US taxes and hide their money offshore, then THEY need to move offshore.)

click: America’s Future In One Image — What’s Really in the GOP Tax Plan 

The GOP tax plan would allow generations of the super wealthy to live tax-free. It is a plan so outrageous that one of America’s top experts in helping the wealthy avoid taxes finds it abominable. Read our explanation from David Cay Johnston.

*** November is National Adoption Awareness Month #NAAM

By LT (adoptee, top photo from my memoir book cover)

I have written on this blog about my story, my own search, my reunion, my work to help other adoptees, and the Lost Children Book Series. So MANY times. And I appreciate you have all hung in here with me on the adoptionland coverage, and the human trafficking issues. (If you have not read the coverage, use the search bar on this blog, or the Category tags.)  There are so many stories, after meeting so many adoptees. Not just Native adoptees – adoptees from everywhere.

Where are we now? Not far at all… I wrote this a few years ago:

Now more serious stuff…. It’s National Adoption Awareness Month. I call it Be-Wareness Month. Why? The billion dollar adoption industry tries its best to recruit new people to adopt. Few want to adopt a child(ren) from foster care. Why? They are too old, come with baggage (not just luggage), or already talk.  Foster care kids are the ones who truly are in need of good parents, definitely.

Over at American Indian Adoptees, I’m post lots of adoption news as it relates to American Indian Adoptees. Visit: http://www.splitfeathers.blogspot.com.  

It is a crazy world out there as more people are waking up to the reality of adoption myths (like “babies are blank slates”)(and some of these orphans are not orphans). As an adoptee I am in favor of legal guardianships for children who cannot be raised by their first families, and their kin. Children need their own name, ancestry, medical history and names of both parents, never erased but part of their legal records.

No more fake amended birth certificates that follow us our entire lives. PLEASE!

Here is a revealing 2015 post about the Evolution of Birth Certificates.

Ignorance of biological ancestry has had devastating consequences for some. In the U.K. in 2008, twins that were separated and adopted at birth unknowingly married each other. This year, a Brazilian couple found out after they were married that the same biological mother had abandoned them as infants. Random meetings amongst half siblings are not uncommon, as many have reported in the news, and on the DSR. One mom realized that a distant relative, one whom she and her children had spent time with at family gatherings, had donated sperm and was in fact the biological parent of her children.

From my friend Amanda:

Adoption Statistics That Matter. Right now, private adoption agencies are figuratively peeing their pants about the Adoption Tax Credit because they can charge more when the tax credit is in tact and as high as possible. They claim that the numbers of adopted children will drop drastically as a result (no they won’t, BTW). Blah. Here is some gross stuff that matters more:

-Black and Native children are disproportionately more likely to be taken into foster care than white children.

-Black children, specifically black boys, are less likely to be adopted.

-Adopted children are more likely to become foster children than any other child.

-It costs more to adopt a white female infant, privately, than any other child. The “fees” to adopt a boy of color are at least half of this.

This is an industry. Racism, sexism, adultism, and classism fuel it.

p.s. THANK YOU for reading this long post and watching the videos. YOU ROCK!

[google-site-verification: google237ae8173a935e46.html]

 

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Change Is Coming: Youth Suicide Pacts, Canada’s Move Away from the 141 Year Old Indian Act and more news

By Lara Trace Hentz

I am still on my hiatus, of course, but these stories I have covered on this news blog before (kinda). I will be back later in 2017. That is, if we don’t suffer a nuke someday soon.

***

From August 11, 2017 at Indian Country Today

Wawatay News reported that the Canadian Army responded to a declaration of emergency by the government of Wapekeka, an Oji-Cree community of about 400, located about 375 miles north of Thunder Bay. The emergency was an epidemic of youth suicide. The First Nation asked for outside help after the third suicide by a 12-year-old girl this year and discovery of suicide pacts among some youngsters.

The Army sent a unit of Rangers—an all-indigenous unit of part time reservists—with an assignment to conduct night patrols and daytime activities for at risk youth.

Chief Brennan Sainnawap commented in extending thanks to the responding Rangers:

There were no suicides after the Rangers arrived. There were attempts but no suicides. The Rangers coming in helped our staff on the ground and the whole of the community to have a chance to rest. We were traumatized and exhausted. The Rangers gave us breathing room.

The Rangers did not approach the assignment as policing. They spread out in the community and tried to get to know the kids, but they did take custody of some suicide paraphernalia. They made lots of referrals to suicide counselors. A few kids were airlifted for emergency treatment.

As the government was able to bring in more civilian help the reservists withdrew as a unit, but individual friendships remain. If Chief Sainnawap’s evaluation is correct, the Rangers hit the sweet spot of signifying to the kids that the government cares without becoming an oppressive force.

Cousin Ray helpfully pointed out once more that the responding unit was indigenous, and it might have been harder for a unit made up of settlers to find the sweet spot even with the best intentions.

***

For First Nations, the end of the Indian Act is an opportunity to return to tradition and empower indigenous female leaders

Sandra LaFleur • August 12, 2017

Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, Jody Wilson-Raybould’s historic announcement of a move away from the 141 year old Indian Act had to have left some Assembly of First Nations (AFN), and provincial Indigenous leaders scratching their heads. Indigenous activist leaders (land protectors, water protectors, suicide watch groups), Native Women’s Association of Canada {NWAC}, Idle No More {INM}, Congress of Aboriginal Peoples (CAP), grassroots people and the average non-indigenous Canadian are also likely, wondering what a life beyond the Indian Act means and how the move will affect them in their day to day lives.

… Let’s use Monaco as an example

The Treaty of Versailles is an agreement between France and Monaco similar to that of First Nations treaty’s with the Crown (Britain’s representative; Canada), is eerily similar in basic foundation….

Monaco has its own law enforcement similar to what is already implemented on most First Nation communities. And the near two mile sovereign state also has a Constitution of Monaco (adopted in 1962 and updated to reflect government power and legislative changes). Furthermore and somewhat, simplistically, Monaco’s agreement with France came in part by Monaco’s cessation of land to (similar as First Nation’s and the Crown’s agreement on land), France and in return, an agreement was reached wherein, a part of France’s obligation is a responsibility to militarily protect Monaco.

There are many more similarities however; the Treaty of Versailles could be a starting point in building First Nation, nation-to-nation legislation, with Canada.

First Nation government leaders, activists, FN women’s groups and all affected parties need to start the process.

The process could be as simple as surveying individual First Nation members on who they would like to see sit at the helm; in mediating the drafting of new legislation.

Read the entire Op-ED: Change Is Coming: Canada’s Move Away from the 141 Year Old Indian Act – Indian Country Media Network

 

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A new Navajo law criminalizes human trafficking on the country’s largest American Indian reservation.

READ: Navajo Sign Law Criminalizing Human Trafficking – Indian Country Media Network

 

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U.S. House appropriators did what they could before recess to limit dramatic cuts to American Indian programs proposed by the Trump administration.

READ: Trump’s Proposed Cuts to American Indian Programs Still in Play – Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly

 

***

Museums Move to Return Human Remains to Indigenous Peoples – The New York Times

top photo

 

Billions trafficking and enslaving “disposable people”

By Lara Trace (abolitionist)

“It’s all about the money. Human trafficking is insanely profitable. If you really think about it: You can sell a kilo of Heroin once; You can sell a 13-year-old girl 20 times a night, 365 days a year.”

Read this about a rescue at a truck stop

An estimated $150 billion is made by human traffickers, after the number one crime: drug trafficking…just think about the heroin epidemic happening in your neighborhood and illegal drugs being sold on your street. Trafficking drugs and people are street crimes, highly profitable. And it spreads like a plague:  Alaskan Arctic Development concerns

John Trudell calls this trafficking process “mining humans.” The atrocity we are seeing with drugs and human trafficking is a sign we are living in an unhealthy damaged society.

Watch these:

I posted several articles on this topic when this blog focused on human trafficking and modern day slavery, starting back in 2012.

jan_trafficking_month

Young men and women must be taught at an early age that women and children are not for sale.  These traffickers find new victims every single day and find buyers for them.

In the money game, every human sold becomes a profit machine, so the only way to end this slavery is to stop playing this game and buying sex.  Our children need to know that they could be snatched off the street and trafficked, and even killed.

There are an estimated 20.9 million victims of human slavery, with 1.5 million in North America.

MORE Here

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Since 1999, Dr. Transchel has been researching modern day human trafficking around the world. Her findings, after interviews with dozens of victims, will surprise and shock even those who consider themselves well-informed. Besides for working as a professor of History at CSU Chico, Dr. Transchel provides trainings for various branches of the military as well as the state department, on domestic and international human trafficking and she also serves as an expert witness on human trafficking from Moldova in Federal Asylum hearings.

 

Sign HERE: Tell U.S. law enforcement to crack down on $150 billion human trafficking epidemic… you are not powerless… thank you!

 

One of my favorite poets shared this with me last night: https://jdubqca.com/2016/07/23/its-all-about-the-money/

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I'm reading: Native American Cultural Appropriation Is a War of Meaning | Sioux Chef | Woven Tale Press | Mr. Hornaday’s War | Rape Culture

You may want to read them. I did! xox Lara Trace

FACE?

Such is the case with FACE, an F.B.I. program described in a new, blistering report from the United States Government Accountability Office. FACE stands for Facial Analysis, Comparison, and Evaluation, the name of a relatively new unit within the agency. The G.A.O. found that the F.B.I. has been disregarding some of even the most basic privacy protections and standards. Keep Reading

 

Appropriation?

Excerpt:

In Indian country, there is a saying that being Indian is not about what you claim, but who claims you.

Dan Snyder’s grandstanding about the offensive team name is a joke that would be funny if it weren’t so serious for what it means to U.S. American national culture and how it contributes to the common misunderstandings of average Americans. In our upcoming book, “All the Real Indians Died Off” and 20 Other Myths about Native Americans, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and I devote two entire chapters to the controversies surrounding appropriation of Native American cultures.  We discuss the Washington Redsk*ns team name in depth and the broader topic of Native American team mascots in one chapter, and in another we tackle other facets of appropriation including Halloween costumes, spirituality, and identity.  Look for the book’s release this October. (TOP PHOTO)

About the Author 

image from www.beaconbroadside.comDina Gilio-Whitaker (Colville Confederated Tribes) is an independent writer and researcher in Indigenous studies, having earned a bachelor’s degree in Native American Studies and a master’s degree in American Studies from the University of New Mexico, and also holds the position of research associate and associate scholar at the Center for World Indigenous Studies. Her work focuses on issues related to Indigenous nationalism, self-determination, and environmental justice, and more recently the emerging field of critical surf studies. She is a co-author (with Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz) of the forthcoming book from ‘All the Real Indians Died Off’ and 20 Other Myths about Native Americans. An award-winning journalist, she is a frequent contributor to Indian Country Today Media Network and Native Peoples Magazine. Follow her on Twitter at @DinaGWhit and visit her website.

via Native American Cultural Appropriation Is a War of Meaning – Beacon Broadside: A Project of Beacon Press

 

************

Creative and Tasty Lakota Food?? HECK YEAH!

Sean Sherman, who opened a business called The Sioux Chef this fall, is an enrolled member of the Oglala Lakota tribe and grew up on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.

 

READ THIS INTERVIEW

 

 

 

***************

Art, Coffee, Tea and Blogs

Woven Tale Press: Art, Coffee, Tea and Blogs

After coming across this first link from the Google Cultural Institute, I thought I’d take a look at some interesting art this time.

https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/project/art-camera

The ultra definition in these works is incredible. Working with museums around the world, Google has used its Art Camera system to capture the finest details of artworks from their collection.


Next up is a unique way to work with color. And if you have the money, yeah I know I’m talking to artists, go here. If not enjoy the link

James Turrell Allowing Limited Visitors to Roden Crater for $6,500 a Person


This past month I was sidelined from working for awhile so I had the time to explore and download a new library of art catalogs. Create your own library from this extensive list.

http://www.openculture.com/2015/03/download-422-free-art-books-from-the-metropolitan-museum-of-art.html


This article is a bit older but the voices in it are more than worth listening to. so enjoy what women artists have to say across a number of generations.

Women in the Art World


Mr. Hornaday’s War: The Return of the Buffalo

…But Hornaday, always quirky, difficult, and relentlessly persistent, did not stop there. He’d always been a man who loved a good fight (he even fought with his friends), so he went to war on behalf of the bison. As time went on, Hornaday became one of the noisiest, angriest, and most unstoppable conservationists of his day, second only to his friend and colleague Theodore Roosevelt. He was the founder of the National Zoo in Washington, and for thirty years served as director of the Bronx Zoo—sorry, he hated that name, insisting on “The New York Zoological Park”—a soapbox from which he lectured, cajoled, lambasted, and wheedled the American public, the Congress, and anybody else who would listen about the alarming state of the “the grandest quadruped [he had] ever seen.” He also initiated captive breeding programs at the zoo, to see if it were possible, first, and if so, to rebuild the perilously depleted population. With Roosevelt, Hornaday created the American Bison Society, dedicated to bison conservation. And he began fighting to create wild reserves in the west, to give the buffalo a place to roam should their numbers recover.

In his “spare time,” Hornaday also wrote a raft of books about zoology and conservation, fought lax game laws and gun manufacturers, and became a major player in the “Plume Wars” against feathered hat dealers, who were ravaging rookeries in the Everglades and other wild places. He was a vigilante for justice for the animals, a political agitator for the natural world, a man who never knew how to keep quiet in the face of what he considered to be a monstrous crime in progress.  Keep Reading

***

RAPE CULTURE – I have no words to add… read this…

For most of human history, women and children have been treated as possessions of men—as economic assets, trophies, slave labor, and objects of sexual gratification—rather than full persons with preferences and rights, starting with control of our own bodies. This view is so deeply embedded in culture that the concept of sexual consent is wholly absent from the Bible, which continues to profoundly shape modern culture. In Bible texts, virgin females are given in marriage by their fathers, traded as slaves, kept as war booty, and sold as damaged goods to men who have raped them.  The Quran is no better.  This month, Pakistan’s Council of Islamic Ideology proposed legislation giving men the legal right to beat their wives “lightly,” as taught by the Prophet.  A teen who turned down a marriage proposal was tortured and then burned alive by the family of the rejected man, who felt entitled to her. KEEP READING

**********

That’s what I’m reading and processing. How about you?

Stolen Generations is here

See you next week… Lara/Trace

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I’m reading: Native American Cultural Appropriation Is a War of Meaning | Sioux Chef | Woven Tale Press | Mr. Hornaday’s War | Rape Culture

You may want to read them. I did! xox Lara Trace

FACE?

Such is the case with FACE, an F.B.I. program described in a new, blistering report from the United States Government Accountability Office. FACE stands for Facial Analysis, Comparison, and Evaluation, the name of a relatively new unit within the agency. The G.A.O. found that the F.B.I. has been disregarding some of even the most basic privacy protections and standards. Keep Reading

 

Appropriation?

Excerpt:

In Indian country, there is a saying that being Indian is not about what you claim, but who claims you.

Dan Snyder’s grandstanding about the offensive team name is a joke that would be funny if it weren’t so serious for what it means to U.S. American national culture and how it contributes to the common misunderstandings of average Americans. In our upcoming book, “All the Real Indians Died Off” and 20 Other Myths about Native Americans, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and I devote two entire chapters to the controversies surrounding appropriation of Native American cultures.  We discuss the Washington Redsk*ns team name in depth and the broader topic of Native American team mascots in one chapter, and in another we tackle other facets of appropriation including Halloween costumes, spirituality, and identity.  Look for the book’s release this October. (TOP PHOTO)

About the Author 

image from www.beaconbroadside.comDina Gilio-Whitaker (Colville Confederated Tribes) is an independent writer and researcher in Indigenous studies, having earned a bachelor’s degree in Native American Studies and a master’s degree in American Studies from the University of New Mexico, and also holds the position of research associate and associate scholar at the Center for World Indigenous Studies. Her work focuses on issues related to Indigenous nationalism, self-determination, and environmental justice, and more recently the emerging field of critical surf studies. She is a co-author (with Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz) of the forthcoming book from ‘All the Real Indians Died Off’ and 20 Other Myths about Native Americans. An award-winning journalist, she is a frequent contributor to Indian Country Today Media Network and Native Peoples Magazine. Follow her on Twitter at @DinaGWhit and visit her website.

via Native American Cultural Appropriation Is a War of Meaning – Beacon Broadside: A Project of Beacon Press

 

************

Creative and Tasty Lakota Food?? HECK YEAH!

Sean Sherman, who opened a business called The Sioux Chef this fall, is an enrolled member of the Oglala Lakota tribe and grew up on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.

 

READ THIS INTERVIEW

 

 

 

***************

Art, Coffee, Tea and Blogs

Woven Tale Press: Art, Coffee, Tea and Blogs

After coming across this first link from the Google Cultural Institute, I thought I’d take a look at some interesting art this time.

https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/project/art-camera

The ultra definition in these works is incredible. Working with museums around the world, Google has used its Art Camera system to capture the finest details of artworks from their collection.


Next up is a unique way to work with color. And if you have the money, yeah I know I’m talking to artists, go here. If not enjoy the link

James Turrell Allowing Limited Visitors to Roden Crater for $6,500 a Person


This past month I was sidelined from working for awhile so I had the time to explore and download a new library of art catalogs. Create your own library from this extensive list.

http://www.openculture.com/2015/03/download-422-free-art-books-from-the-metropolitan-museum-of-art.html


This article is a bit older but the voices in it are more than worth listening to. so enjoy what women artists have to say across a number of generations.

Women in the Art World


Mr. Hornaday’s War: The Return of the Buffalo

…But Hornaday, always quirky, difficult, and relentlessly persistent, did not stop there. He’d always been a man who loved a good fight (he even fought with his friends), so he went to war on behalf of the bison. As time went on, Hornaday became one of the noisiest, angriest, and most unstoppable conservationists of his day, second only to his friend and colleague Theodore Roosevelt. He was the founder of the National Zoo in Washington, and for thirty years served as director of the Bronx Zoo—sorry, he hated that name, insisting on “The New York Zoological Park”—a soapbox from which he lectured, cajoled, lambasted, and wheedled the American public, the Congress, and anybody else who would listen about the alarming state of the “the grandest quadruped [he had] ever seen.” He also initiated captive breeding programs at the zoo, to see if it were possible, first, and if so, to rebuild the perilously depleted population. With Roosevelt, Hornaday created the American Bison Society, dedicated to bison conservation. And he began fighting to create wild reserves in the west, to give the buffalo a place to roam should their numbers recover.

In his “spare time,” Hornaday also wrote a raft of books about zoology and conservation, fought lax game laws and gun manufacturers, and became a major player in the “Plume Wars” against feathered hat dealers, who were ravaging rookeries in the Everglades and other wild places. He was a vigilante for justice for the animals, a political agitator for the natural world, a man who never knew how to keep quiet in the face of what he considered to be a monstrous crime in progress.  Keep Reading

***

RAPE CULTURE – I have no words to add… read this…

For most of human history, women and children have been treated as possessions of men—as economic assets, trophies, slave labor, and objects of sexual gratification—rather than full persons with preferences and rights, starting with control of our own bodies. This view is so deeply embedded in culture that the concept of sexual consent is wholly absent from the Bible, which continues to profoundly shape modern culture. In Bible texts, virgin females are given in marriage by their fathers, traded as slaves, kept as war booty, and sold as damaged goods to men who have raped them.  The Quran is no better.  This month, Pakistan’s Council of Islamic Ideology proposed legislation giving men the legal right to beat their wives “lightly,” as taught by the Prophet.  A teen who turned down a marriage proposal was tortured and then burned alive by the family of the rejected man, who felt entitled to her. KEEP READING

**********

That’s what I’m reading and processing. How about you?

Stolen Generations is here

See you next week… Lara/Trace

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What VERSION are you reading?

By Lara Trace Hentz  (history buff)

 

Wounded Knee Media Coverage (New Film: Line in the Sand by Kevin McKiernan

EXAMPLE  http://listen.sdpb.org/post/dakota-midday-wounded-knee-line-sand#stream/0

Years ago I realized the “version” is what we need to examine as much as the writing itself.  It’s very very important to look at WHO wrote it and why.  Ellowyn in Pine Ridge, South Dakota shared her tribe’s version of history that differed greatly from American textbooks.  That version of my education began in early 1990s in her kitchen.

In Pine Ridge, it’s usually by 4th grade the student turns off and loses interest, Ellowyn told me.  (She was a teacher.)  The Lakota do not believe what is in the American textbook because their history is left out.  She thinks (as do many in her Oglala tribe) that it’s important history is taught at home. It’s oral.  It’s not written down.  (If you google Oglala Lakota history, it’s generally written by the non-Indian and not accepted by the Oglala.)

My anthropologist sister Dr. Raeschelle Deimel in Vienna Austria and I were also discussing education a few days ago.  (She teaches college-level history.) It’s obvious certain “subjects” (like history) are a matter of importance and priority for governments who control our education and what version we get.  Not only do they control what we learn but how much, when we learn it, and there is no legal enforcement to measure accuracy or honesty, obviously.

Do parents have a say in what children learn?  Yes, kinda.  (If you teach at home, choose the version and control the story yourself).  (Top Photo:  Rae sent me this book and said it’s very important all Americans read it.)  I plan to spend my summer reading Zinn ingesting every chapter. I am still a history student on my own.

We in America don’t even recognize the agenda and propaganda in our history textbooks, Rae said.

Sadly too many Americans have turned their backs on history, we decided.  Probably too boring.  If you went to college you might choose a certain period of history to study in depth.  (That would also depend on which professor you get and how good they are.)  Now we think it’s a general lack of interest and disgust, as in “what good is history?” to make my life or salary better… or maybe deep down we sixth-sense we’re learning bullshit (?) – perhaps.

c4cebe7e3a9bf5d636b4a784167434b41716b42It surprised me when I learned from a German journalist Monique in Munich in 2005 that Americans know more about the Nazis than the Germans do.  History again is used as a tool, or it’s not used at all.  Why would the Germans suppress their own history? She said they don’t have museums to teach any version of their own Nazi history.  REALLY!  (Of course she told me she and other Germans do learn about it on their own.  Many of their parents were sent to the Hitler’s Youth Camps and were indoctrinated with propaganda.) History/story used as mind control? She said yes.

What I learned in my Catholic grade school happened over two straight days watching Germany’s Holocaust films on concentration camps when I was in 4th grade.  I now realize how disturbing it was for me to see that as a kid.  The nuns warned us but didn’t give us an option to leave the classroom.  I choked back tears and nearly threw up. I had nightmares for months.

Much later as an adult I studied WWII and the Nazis on my own, watching documentaries especially.  (We called it my scary Nazi phase.) I needed to understand HOW people could be this way and why. It took me many years to see WHO was behind the genocide of American Indians, and Jews, and many other ethnic minority groups and WHAT they ultimately wanted: domination and land, mostly.  READ a historic SOLUTION BY GABOR MATE

Today of course I question everything I read.  My two granddaughters deserve better than what their history textbooks will teach them.  It’s my job and it’s going to have to come from me.  Oral history, at home, in my kitchen.

 

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” –George Santayana (16 December 1863 in Madrid, Spain – 26 September 1952 in Rome, Italy) was a philosopher, essayist, poet and novelist.

History is so peculiar, right?  You can look and look –and read and read — and find only glimmers of truth.  “Those who do not learn history are doomed to repeat it.” It was someone who told me to look at it as His = Story (Chapter 19 Surprises in Zinn’s book is an eye-opener on Indian Country history. I humbly suggest you spend some time this summer with Zinn’s book or watch him on youtube, if you haven’t already.

 

Read this blog too! Dr. Stuart Bramhall is brilliant HERE

***

THIS VIDEO simply blew my mind :  please take an hour and listen to Biology of Belief:

f24c8-adoption-visa_200x200

 

**************************

Dealing with adoption propaganda is also a full-time job for some of us…

The war on human trafficking and adoption ebbs and flows…blogs come and go… and here’s a brilliant post from 2013:

From Transracial Eyes blog:

Elsewhere on the site we have explored the “cost” of adoptee activism [ link ], and we have heard some stories of closed-down blogs and the like.  Certain adoptee sites have erased past posts …  (My dear friend Von experienced this censorship with Blogger when her earlier site was taken down. FBI, really?)

Source: The Adoption Mafia.

and HERE

Taking advantage of poor vulnerable families is a crime.  Adoption Agencies are wolves in sheep clothing.

Adoption is really taking children from the poor and giving to the rich.  Adoption Trafficking is coercive language that in the end, the person of ‘power’  manipulates the vulnerable parent, typically the mother, out of her child.  The end goal is to fulfill the demand of wanting infertile adopters and financially benefiting the industry.  The adoption fees are disguised as the costs to ‘process’ the child for adoption and can cost as high as $60,000+ for each transaction.  It’s modern day, 21st century, legalized child trafficking.  Think of how much that $60,000 could help a community in Uganda, China, India keeping families together.  Instead it’s an undercurrent of corruption in foreign countries all happening from the demand of rich Westerners.  The middle man (adoption agencies) strips away the true identity of the child and the adopter buys the child, so he or she will become one of their ‘own’.  In the adopters minds they may think of it as saving an ‘orphan’ or a ‘solution for infertility issues’, but there is strategic modern day ‘verbiage’ agencies use, social workers, lawyers or counselors (or anyone working for the adoption industry) to manipulate young mothers out of their children and that took decades to perfect.

Trafficking in Africa (2016)

2016: Fake passport used to take adopted child Home

For more news on industry practices, go to Adoptionland.org

adoptionlandTo get a copy of Adoptionland: From Orphans to Activists visit here. (I am in this book)

***** I know my views on adoption are controversial. Hey, read me anyway. You might learn something… true?

p.s. If any reader wishes to read Stolen Generations in exchange for an honest review on Amazon, I will email you the pdf or epub. Email me: laratrace@outlook.com.  No strings attached.

SOLD: Human Trafficking (videos)

 

BBC VIDEO published on Aug 1, 2015

Human trafficking is a global problem, with the UN saying victims come from as many as 152 countries, and that a third of those trafficked are children.  BBC News focused on three countries, talking to people who have been trafficked and also to the traffickers themselves.   **Video contains some harrowing testimony**

 

 

A few years ago I decided to dedicate more of this blog to cover stories on human trafficking.  This 2007 video is horrifying. Supposedly this was produced by actor George Clooney.

We have a problem. Trafficking is modern slavery.

In The News: Slavery, Nobel Prize, The Price of Memory, Malala

In the News

 

Kailash Satyarthi, the founder of Bachpan Bachao Andolan, has dedicated his life to the struggle against child labour. Photograph: Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

Kailash Satyarthi: student engineer who saved 80,000 children from slavery

 Clar Ni Chonghaile, theguardian.com, 10 October 2014

Indian children’s rights activist hails Nobel peace prize as an honour to young people ‘whose voice has never been heard’

Kailash Satyarthi says his heroes are the children he has saved from slavery. The Nobel peace prize winner, 60, has been credited with helping to free about 80,000 children from bonded labour since he started his advocacy in the 1980s. He says the Nobel prize “is an honour for my fellow Indians and for all those children whose voice has never been heard before in the country”.

Described as a tireless campaigner for children’s rights, Satyarthi founded Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA) – “save the childhood movement”, roughly translated from the Hindi – in 1980. The organisation has sought to educate the tens of thousands of children it has rescued, reintegrating them into society. Satyarthi has led rescue missions for children and others working in bonded labour in manufacturing industries, surviving several attacks on his life in the process.

Read more at: http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2014/oct/10/kailash-satyarthi-nobel-peace-prize-childrens-rights

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 ‘The Price of Memory’ to Premiere at Montego Bay Cultural Centre

National Gallery of Jamaica | 2014-10-07

The Montego Bay Cultural Centre and National Gallery West are pleased to present the Montego Bay premier of the documentary film, ‘The Price of Memory,’ on Saturday, October 18, starting at 7 pm. Filmmaker, Karen Marks Mafundikwa, will be in attendance at the Montego Bay Cultural Centre, Sam Sharpe Square, to introduce the film and to answer questions afterwards. The event is free to the public but donations are welcomed in support of the Montego Bay Cultural Centre programmes.

Filmed over the span of eleven years, ‘The Price of Memory’ explores the legacy of slavery in the UK and Jamaica and the initiatives and debates surrounding reparations. The film starts in 2002, with Queen Elizabeth II’s visit to Jamaica as part of her Golden Jubilee celebrations, when she is petitioned by a small group of Rastafari for slavery reparations. The film traces this petition and the first reparations lawsuit to be filed in Jamaica against the Queen, while interweaving stories of earlier Rastas who pursued reparations and repatriation in the 1960s.

The filmmaker travels to the UK, exploring the cities which grew wealthy from slavery and the British monarchy’s legacy of slavery, and follows the debates about reparations in both the Jamaican and British parliaments. ‘The Price of Memory’ premiered at the 2014 Pan African Film Festival in Los Angeles and was nominated for Best Documentary Feature at the 2014 Trinidad & Tobago Film Festival in late September.

More information at: http://go-jamaica.com/pressrelease/item.php?id=3809

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Introducing: Beyond Trafficking and Slavery

Neil Howard, Genevieve LeBaron, and Cameron Thibos  6 October 2014

 ‘Modern slavery’, ‘human trafficking’, and ‘forced labour’ are all issues of major political and media concern. Barely a day now passes without some sensational story. Governments everywhere are passing legislation, civil society interest is rocketing, and ever more consumers are asking questions about how their products are made.

Yet for all this attention, how much is actually known about these phenomena? We’ve no shortage of anecdotal stories, but reliable information is in seriously short supply. Mainstream media is quick to present ‘modern slaves’ as living under exceptional circumstances, but it’s often impossible to distinguish their lives from those of people living under ‘ordinary’ capitalist exploitation. Why is this? And why is it that ‘protection’ policies governments put in place so frequently do more harm than good?

These are the kinds of questions that we’ll be exploring over the coming week, and that Beyond Trafficking and Slavery will be answering over the coming year.

Read more: https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery

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Series:

Modern-day slavery in focus
This website is supported, in part, by Humanity United. It is editorially independent and its purpose is to focus on modern-day slavery

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Congrats to Malala on the Nobel Prize to be awarded in December! Read HERE

I’m working on a new interview with a new friend Carol Hand who blogs many things I care about…. like identity and Indian Country… BE BACK SOON… Lara/Trace

In The News

Japan’s wartime sex slavery a ‘terrible’ rights violation – Obama


InterAksyon.com – The online news portal of TV5

SEOUL – The Japanese wartime system of sex slavery was a “terrible” violation of human rights and its victims need to be heard, US President Barack Obama said Friday in Seoul.  Stepping into one of the most contentious issues in Northeast Asia, Obama said there needed to be an accounting of the wrongs perpetrated by Japanese Imperial troops before and during World War II when thousands of women were forced into prostitution.

“This was a terrible, egregious violation of human rights. Those women were violated in ways that even in the midst of war were shocking,” he said. “And they deserve to be heard, they deserve to be respected. And there should be an accurate and clear account of what happened. I think (Japanese) Prime Minister (Shinzo) Abe recognizes this and certainly the Japanese people recognize that the past is something that has to be recognized honestly and fairly.”

Despite formal apologies issued by the Japanese government, South Korea and other nations accuse Tokyo of failing sufficiently to atone for the “comfort women” pressed to service its troops during its brutal war of expansion. 

Read more: http://www.interaksyon.com/article/85491/japans-wartime-sex-slavery-a-terrible-rights-violation-obama

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Sex Slaves and the Surveillance State

Why ‘human trafficking’ is a dangerous term

Thaddeus Russell from the May 2014 issue, Reason.com

Her name, like that of nearly all the victims, is unknown. Not older than a teenager, she has large, downturned eyes, long and wavy hair, and pale skin. She wears a demure white dress, suggesting that the life she lived before she found herself in this dungeon was one of innocence. She stares through the bars of her cage and, because she cannot save herself, prays for rescue. Behind her, a man wearing a bowler hat and a lascivious grin gazes upon his captive prey through the smoke of his cigar. He has paid to rape her and she is powerless to stop him. She is a “white slave.”

This girl is a drawing. She existed only in an image that was part of a flood of claims made in the early 20th century, about legions of white American girls and women being held against their will and forced into prostitution. Thousands of newspaper articles, books, sermons, speeches, plays, and films depicted a vast underground economy of kidnappers and pimps holding godlike power over young female sex slaves. Historians now generally agree that those depictions were mostly or entirely fabrications. There is scant verifiable evidence of American women being kidnapped and physically forced into prostitution, or that such a girl in the picture ever existed.

Read more: http://reason.com/archives/2014/04/22/sex-slaves-and-the-surveillanc


People Magazine highlights book by former human trafficking victim

  • People Magazine highlights book by former human trafficking victim - Photo credit: People Magazine

Now working as an assistant manager at a luggage store, Shyima Hall hopes to go back to school and become an ICE agent.

– Feb. 24 edition of People Magazine

An Egyptian human trafficking victim enslaved as a girl in southern California wrote an autobiography that details her ordeal and subsequent life in the U.S. after being rescued by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) special agents and the local police department.

Shyima Hall shares details from her book, “Hidden Girl,” which was published last month, in this week’s edition of People Magazine.

She dedicates the book to HSI Supervisory Special Agent Mark Abend “for helping me navigate life in the United States, for his assistance in helping me raise awareness of basic human rights, and for his dedication to end slavery in our world,” she writes in the book.

Abend calls it the proudest moment of his career, he said, because of the seemingly insurmountable obstacles the 24-year-old Hall has overcome throughout her life.

“I’ve never seen someone that very well could have had a broken spirit, stand up and say ‘I’m not taking this,’ and become such an example of strength to others,” Abend said.

Hall was sold by her family into slavery in Egypt when she was 10 years old. The Egyptian couple who enslaved her moved to Irvine, Calif., and smuggled Hall with them.

She spent two years living in squalor while caring for her new family around the clock with no pay, until HSI special agents and Irvine police officers rescued her after receiving an anonymous tip.

“This was a shining example of how the work we do at ICE helps families,” Abend said.

He has stayed in touch with Hall through the years, the relationship providing a sense of stability for her as she built her life in the U.S., he said. She aims to become an ICE special agent because of how the agency helped free her from slavery, she told Abend.

“There is so much she has done and still so much she wants to do, she is so full of life,” Abend said.

She became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 2011.

 Full Story

Historians against Slavery: Tiya Miles

In this special guest post, Tiya Miles, professor of history at the University of Michigan, a 2011 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship winner, and founder of ECO Girls, shares her thoughts on a recent conference connecting the history of enslavement to the continuation of unjust confinement and incarceration today. As she notes, the conference raised questions for many attendees about our responsibilities as historians in the present when confronting problems like human trafficking and modern-day enslavement.

The 15th Annual Gilder Lehrman Center (GLC) International Conference at Yale University, held in November 2013, focused on the theme of Indigenous Enslavement and Incarceration in North American History. Conceived by Native American history scholar, Ned Blackhawk, in collaboration with GLC Director, David Blight, and organized by Blackhawk, Blight, and the fantastic GLC staff members: Assistant Director, David Spatz, Melissa McGrath, and Thomas Thurston, the conference generated insightful, intense and heartfelt discussion. According to Blackhawk, this two-day symposium garnered the largest pre-registration in the history of the GLC, a testimony to the high interest in slavery in native experience, in the intersections of slavery (past and present) and incarceration, as well as in the overlaps and echoes between Native American and African American histories.

The interdisciplinary event drew together scholars of Native American studies, slavery studies, African American studies, and legal studies, as well as legal and mental health practitioners from the U.S. and Canada and numerous members of the New England native and black communities. The conversations ranged from a collective meditation on the power of dreams as a force outside of colonialism (inspired by literary scholar Beth Piatote) to confining images of native people in children’s literature (spurred by education studies scholar Debbie Reese), to the jailing of children in present-day Montana (noted by sociologist Luana Ross).

READ MORE HERE

(Photo I took last day of conference at YALE – Tiya is seated in the middle)

And I shared links to this important conference here – you can watch online!

http://splitfeathers.blogspot.com/2013/12/amazing-new-scholarship-on-indian.html

 

Modern Slavery: #NOT MY LIFE

January is Human Trafficking Awareness Month…

Not My Life is the first film to depict the cruel and dehumanizing practices of human trafficking and modern slavery on a global scale.

Filmed on five continents, in a dozen countries, Not My Life takes viewers into a world where millions of children are exploited, every day, through an astonishing array of practices including forced labor, domestic servitude, begging, sex tourism, sexual violence, and child soldiering.

“Human traffickers are earning billions of dollars on the backs and in the beds of our children,” says the film’s director, Academy Award nominee, Robert Bilheimer, “and yet no one knows this is happening.” We have a huge responsibility, right now, to learn the truth and act on it.

Challenging though it may be, Not My Life’s message is ultimately one of hope. Victims of slavery can be set free and go on to live happy and productive lives. Those who advocate for slavery victims are growing in numbers, and are increasingly effective. At this crossroads for the defining human rights issue of our time, Not My Life tells us, as the late Jonathan Mann said, “We can no longer flee, no longer hide, no longer separate ourselves.”

National Human Trafficking Hotline 1-888-373-7888 OR Text BeFree (233733)
List of Global Trafficking Hotlines

I will be discussing this topic on Blog Talk Radio on January 22 at 9 pm….Trace/Lara

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/whispernthunder

Collective Amnesia: Leaders who don’t lead

sheepPart Two

By Lara Hentz (aka Trace)

We are awakening…

This tale is about the “haves” and “have nots.”

We’ve all heard campaign promises and political sermons, then once elected, we might catch a glimpse of the leader on TV and it appears all those promises are long gone, long forgotten. And why we elected them, those reasons are forgotten too.

It makes us angry we can’t elect good leaders but then apathy sets in. We ask, what can we do? We’re not as powerful as them.

We still wonder, “What happens to our chosen leaders?”

We see problems they need to fix:  global poverty, low wages, high taxes, epic pollution, insanity like the BP Oil Spill, nukes like Japan’s disaster Fukushima, Prison Corporations enslavers, Bad Banksters who never go to jail, war upon war upon war, the exploitation and suffering of Trafficked Humans and the list goes on and on and on…

Our attention span is under three minutes now. TV has transformed us into zombies. We might hear scary things prior to elections that surprise us, but by then it’s too late. It’s like we can’t fix anything since these problems are too big for anyone to fix. That is just an illusion. We forgive our chosen leaders so easily.

Yet they keep us poor, in the dark, struggling, afraid. Those leaders, who I call the elite, become unavailable, unreachable. They control us with promises and TV speeches. Nothing changes.

Human suffering has only grown. It’s still between the “haves” and the “have nots.”

As gas and fuel prices inch higher and higher, I know someone is controlling prices to control us. Once gas prices reach a certain point, some of us will have to choose fuel or food.  We know we have to choose our leaders better the next election but the cycle repeats itself over and over.

It seems our leaders lack empathy. It’s like they have a brain virus and can’t tell us the truth and lose sense of reality. It’s like being elected gives them amnesia and all they want is to be reelected. And the cycle repeats while we wait for progress and change.

The elite do feed off of human suffering.  Whoever invented linear time did this to enslave us. Watching the clock, we become obsessed with the hours we work and the hours we watch TV. I read Matthew Fox’s book, “The Reinvention of Work.” Changing our workday to 30 hours could change the world! It would free us up to be parents and grandparents and not slaves to their system.

We fill stadiums to watch sports but we can’t seem to gather enough people to end human slavery and suffering as it exists today.

Why is that?

Once you see the truth, you can’t unsee it!  I only ask that you ask questions to be awake.

(to be continued)

READ: Collective Amnesia Misogyny

SIDEBAR: Nuclear Issues & Fukushima:

On Coast To Coast Jan. 6, three nuclear energy experts (Scott Portzline, Arnie Gundersen, and Kevin Kamps) in separate hours, discussed the status of the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, the cover-ups of scientific data, as well as general issues about nuclear power, and nuclear waste. Last week there was a spate of false reports about Fukushima’s Unit 3 having new radiation plumes of steam coming from it, and that people living on the West Coast should prepare to evacuate, Portzline detailed. While this was a hoax, the climate of uncertainty around Fukushima has been created by the lack of truth from TEPCO (Tokyo Electric Power Company), as well as the US government, and the International Atomic Energy Agency, he commented. “In my opinion, Fukushima is a level 8 on the international nuclear event scale, (the levels normally only go up to 7),” as there are multiple sources of radiation, and the situation requires international assistance and monitoring, Portzline continued.

Gundersen concurred on the direness of the Fukushima situation– in contrast to Chernobyl and Three Mile Island, the “spigot” isn’t turned off yet, and radiation continues to leak into the Pacific Ocean. Fish are picking up extraordinarily high levels of radioactive materials, and Gundersen said he would not eat fish that comes from the West Coast. In Japan, “the epidemiological data that will develop over the next 30 years [will show that] somewhere between 100,000 and 1 million new cancers will develop as a result of this,” but the nuclear industry can hide behind the fact that a high percentage of people get cancer anyway, he pointed out. Gunderson stressed the importance of stopping the groundwater contamination, and suggested building a trench of zeolite to absorb the radiation surrounding the plant.

Kamps cited that 72,000 gallons a day of radioactively contaminated water is flowing into the ocean, and that really adds up over nearly three years of time since the accident. Making matters works, Unit 4 at Fukushima could be on the brink of collapse, he added. Some countries such as Germany are phasing out nuclear power entirely after the lessons of Fukushima and Chernobyl, he said. As an alternative, wind power has a lot of potential to be tapped, and the first offshore floating wind turbines were just installed in the Gulf of Maine, which could provide as much electricity as five atomic reactors, Kamps asserted.

my crazy: human trafficking, historical trauma

Historical traumaBy LARA

I have written here on this blog about my becoming Lara, integrating parts of my persona that were buried or stunted or created as an adoptee growing up with strangers.

I had posted on Facebook (as Trace) how I experienced huge chunks of CRAZY, had patterns of unhealthy behavior and even how big blocks of memory seemed hazy or gone. This does not make me any different (or better off or worse off) than others.  If I am to heal myself, I need to know and see how I coped as this little girl who lived in fear and confusion.

My thoughts now?  My crazy hazy chunks of time were in fact self-preservation – it was the only way I could handle what I had to face to avoid fracturing or destroying my delicate developing mind. (And this did happen to others living in a dysfunctional setting in childhood.) I am now aware I had various coping tools, as did my friends. One of the best tools was a vivid imagination. Another one: listening to the small voice inside, a voice of sanity and clarity. Another tool was determination. I was determined to survive and very determined to create a safe environment for myself as a young adult, when I could move physically and emotionally away from where I was raised. I was determined to open my adoption and find my relatives and my ancestry. I never lost that determination. I grew strong.

I had a conversation a few days ago with my friend and co-author Patricia [Our anthology is Two Worlds: Lost Children of the Indian Adoption Projects] about this process of integration, how we created little people who could handle situations, a character and persona tougher than us – and now as grown-ups, these little people are no longer needed.  I am not suggesting we had multiple personalities. That is too psycho-speak for us.  As babies and toddlers, we were confronted with strangers who called themselves our parents and they had their own instability. (Both of us had an alcoholic parent). Their imbalance caused our childhoods to be terrifying and unstable. That can put us in a situation of weakness and vulnerability. Our real fears made us very unstable and untrusting.

We chose to survive so we had to be creative in some way. Being creative is an outlet for a grief this enormous. Patricia is definitely an artist and I was a musician – and we both kept journals.

Add to that we are abandoned as infants and not nurtured and denied the bonds with our mother-creator. That also created an instability and frailty that carried forward from childhood to adulthood. This trauma is called the PRIMAL WOUND. Read Nancy Verrier if you are curious.

Remember the movie The Three Faces of Eve? Though Eve was an adult, she had created personalities who could stand-in for her. One movie that terrified me was SYBIL. Sally Fields played a child who was terribly abused and created numerous personalities who stood in for her while she underwent the abuse.  In therapy, these movie characters found out they had created stand-ins, what I call the little people. When they are no longer needed they can melt away. Or integrate back into the soul.

9781479318285_COVERSplit Feathers, what American Indians call adoptees or their lost children, have this integration challenge.  It has nothing to do with being crazy, though adoptees tell me they feel like they acted crazy in trying to deal with the strangers who raised us.  I don’t see how we could not be crazy. What other method would work? We had to be split.

Patricia and I are both Native adoptees.  We know this history now. We know it’s historical trauma in our DNA. We know we have the tools to heal this ourselves.

Even as kids we could see we were very different from our stranger parents, yet adoption forced us to pretend, be good and show we were grateful.  Isn’t that crazy?

Anyone who questions the Adoption Cartel (and their propaganda and billions in profit) will be called crazy.

What is crazy are the people who believe “adoption” works so well. How a closed adoption is good – that is crazy. Punishing a woman for having a baby while unmarried and forcing her to give up her child – that is crazy. Sealing our adoption records – that is crazy.  Giving people the idea they can buy an orphan – that is crazy. Believing an adopted child won’t want to know the truth or find their birth relatives – that is crazy.

There are couples right now holding a bake sale, asking their friends to raise money so that they can adopt an orphan. That is crazy – dangerously crazy! Read The Child Catchers if you want the truth about orphans (and how many of these children are not orphans at all but have living parents!! They are sold into adoption as a commodity.)

The fact is adoption is human trafficking.  If a child is taken from their natural parent(s) and sold to strangers, that is trafficking.  If money is exchanged for children and babies, that is trafficking. If lawyers and judges and adoption agencies charge money to handle babies for sale, they are trafficking in humans.

I do write this as a survivor of human trafficking, what was a closed adoption that I opened.  I write this from a place of sanity and balance, after years of working on myself, knowing myself, finding my relatives, and yes, learning the truth.

No, I am not crazy.

I do plan to keep blogging about HUMAN TRAFFICKING in 2014. Patricia and I are working on a new collection of adoption narratives by Native American adoptees that will be published in 2014. The new anthology CALLED HOME will also include adoptees who cannot access and open their sealed files.

Thanks for following this blog!  I’ll be back right after the holiday season! xoxox

Happy Holidays!

Some Quotes and the Summit of the Moral Pedestal

hub*Clearly, the specific experiences of triad members vary, but there is commonality of affective experiences which persists throughout the individual’s or family’s life cycle development. The recognition of these similarities permits dialogue among triad members and allows those professionals with whom they interface to intervene in proactive as well as curative ways.
The presence of these issues does not indicate, however, that either the individual or the institution of adoption is pathological or pseudo-pathological. Rather, these are expected issues that evolve logically out of the nature of adoption. Before the recent advent of open and cooperative practices, adoption has been practised as a win/lose or adversarial process. In such an approach, birth families lose their child in order for the adoptive family to gain a child. The adoptee was transposed from one family to another with time-limited and, at times, short-sighted consideration of the child’s long-term needs. Indeed, the emphasis has been on the needs of the adults – on the needs of the birth family not to parent and on the needs of the adoptive family to parent. The ramifications of this attitude can be seen in the number of difficulties experienced by adoptees and their families over their lifetimes.

 

There’s no place for woolly thinking anymore when writing about adoption, it’s too complex, there are too many exceptions, variations, contradictions and proofs of the opposite. It’s really not for the faint-hearted, the half-hearted researcher or those on pedestals of their own or anyone else’s making. How often we see those self-appointed ‘experts’ who advise, preach and advertise their wares as if adoption is a subject that you can do a few courses in and be proficient.

Read the rest here: Some Quotes and the Summit of the Moral Pedestal.

Thoughts from Lara: Clearly I see adoption as human trafficking – creating a family whereby destroying another family is immoral and should be illegal. Poverty creates these Third World conditions.  Yes, children do need to be parented. If a child needs a home, then new parents should become a legal guardian to him/her while the children retain their identity, name, history, ancestry and should have some contact with the biological parents with supervision if there are severe issues.  Children would never choose to be adopted. A child is a pawn in this adoption game of human trafficking. It is not about best interest if you erase a child’s identity.  Adoption is a perversion in that regard. Adoptees ultimately play the roles demanded by society and expected by some adopters. That is no way to live. That is ridiculous. Why create something that harms and hurts children? I do not have the answer!