Generations of Indigenous Voices from NY State | Apache 8 | Where are They Buried? | Lousy? Indigenous news coverage

 

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The exhibition Community and Continuity: Native American Art of New York is culled from the New York State Museum’s collection of contemporary Native American art.  NYSM is known for its historical and archeological Indigenous objects, which number in the millions and range in date from 13,000 years ago to the early 20th century.  But in 1996, the museum began acquiring works by living Algonquin and Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) artists to celebrate the continuing vibrancy of these communities.

Community and Continuity: Native American Art of New York continues at the Samuel Dorsky Museum (on the campus of the State University of New York at New Paltz, 1 Hawk Drive, New Paltz, NY) through December 9. The exhibition was curated by John Hart and Gwendolyn Saul.

READ: Generations of Indigenous Voices from New York State

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This is the story of the courageous all-female Apache 8 firefighting unit which has protected their reservation and responded to wildfires around the nation for 30 years. This group, which recently became co-ed, earned the reputation of being fierce, loyal and dependable–and tougher than their male colleagues.Despite facing gender stereotypes and the problems that come with life on the impoverished reservation, the women became known as some of the country’s most elite firefighters. The film focuses on four women from different generations of Apache 8 crewmembers who speak tenderly and often humorously of hardship, loss, family, community and pride in being a firefighter.Official Selection at the American Indian Film Festival.

Source: Apache 8 | Kanopy

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Thousands of Canada’s indigenous children died in church-run boarding schools

Armed with everything from school attendance records to drones, researchers across Canada are racing to shed light on a bleak part of the country’s history: How many indigenous children died at residential schools, and where are their unmarked graves? From 1883 to 1998, nearly 150,000 indigenous children were forcibly separated from their families and sent to the government-funded, church-run boarding schools in an attempt to assimilate them. Once there, they were frequently neglected and abused. What happened at the schools was akin to “cultural genocide,” concluded a 2015 report from Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission. It also found that at least 3,200 students died at residential schools over those 115 years — a much higher rate than for students elsewhere in Canada — though the commission contended that the number was probably much higher and merited further investigation.

The religious organizations that operated the schools — the Anglican Church of Canada, Presbyterian Church in Canada, United Church of Canada, Jesuits of English Canada and some Catholic groups — in 2015 expressed regret for the “well-documented” abuses. The Catholic Church has never offered an official apology, something that Trudeau and others have repeatedly called for.

Source: Thousands of Canada’s indigenous children died in church-run boarding schools. Where are they buried? – The Washington Post

 

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Most journalists also said we didn’t bother to cover Indigenous peoples because there was no journalistic payoff. We, reporters, preferred to do stories to improve situations and conditions, by pointing out things that didn’t work properly. We looked for bad guys, stories about corruption or inept business owners, government administrators, politicians, cops, for example. Yet similar stories about Indigenous communities never went anywhere. Things never changed. Also, by telling these stories, we faced accusations of concentrating on the negative. (See comment above about racism.)

Source: Why Coverage of Indigenous Issues Is So Lousy | FAIR

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A Retrospective of Edgar Heap of Birds Rises High

With public art pieces, biting political, text-based work, and more intimate abstract paintings, this small exhibition illuminates Heap of Birds’s expansive career.

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According to Bill Anthes’s book, Edgar Heap of Birds, the artist began his “Native Hosts” series back in 1988. Like the new commission displayed outside Bockley Gallery, the “Native Hosts” contain the “settler” name of a place written backwards, with the Native Host spelled forward, welcoming the viewer. Like many place names around the country, Minnesota is a derivation of a Native American word (“Mní sóta” means clear blue water in Dakota), but its appropriation by a state responsible for many atrocities against Native people warrants Heap of Birds’s critical treatment.  Cloud Man Village, meanwhile, was a short-lived community led by Dakota chief Cloud Man, on the banks of the Bde Maka Ska lakeThe Bockley Gallery currently has on view a mini-retrospective of the work of Edgar Heap of Birds (whose Cheyenne name is Hock E Aye VI), which contains examples of different bodies of work the Cheyenne/Arapaho artist has created over his extensive career.

Heap of Birds’s showing at Bockley offers a small taste of the immense body of work this artist has created over a number of decades, and the only improvement I can suggest is that he deserves much more recognition. If there’s one thing that I’ve learned from the “Scaffold” and Jimmie Durham controversies, it’s that there’s a need for more attention to be paid to Native artists working in contemporary practices.

Edgar Heap of Birds runs through October 21 at Bockley Gallery (2123 West 21st Street, Minneapolis).

READ MORE: A Retrospective of Edgar Heap of Birds Rises High

Calvert Nevaquaya on Comanche culture #NDN #ART

“The thing I would like for [viewers] to see in our Comanche culture, through our art, is the beauty of our people—sometimes the spiritual side and the hardship—the good things our people had to offer,” said Calvert Nevaquaya. “Through a lot of my father’s art, people were amazed by the beauty and the culture and the things he had painted. He had love stories he painted. Our people had lovers in our tribe as well as warriors. A lot of the people outside the Numunu look at us as savages or wild Indians. Through our artwork, I hope they see the beauty and spiritual side.”

Read more:http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/07/06/nevaquaya-brothers-breaking-traditions-in-new-exhibit-opening-saturday-122411 http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/07/06/nevaquaya-brothers-breaking-traditions-in-new-exhibit-opening-saturday-122411#ixzz1zwhZUcHi

The Nevaquaya brothers have a chance to show how their family tradition is taking a new direction with “Breaking Traditions,” a two-person show that opens 3-7 p.m. Saturday July 7 at the Southern Plains Indian Museum, 715 E. Central in Anadarko, Okla. and shows through August 18. The opening will feature both an art discussion by the brothers and a flute concert.

Talking to Ghosts

art exhibit

http://www.jackstraw.org/
Jack Straw New Media Gallery

Talking to Ghosts:
Waiting in the River between Worlds
An installation by Nari Baker

July 22 – September 16, 2011

Jack Straw New Media Gallery
4261 Roosevelt Way NE
Seattle 98105

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday, 9 – 5
Talking to Ghosts: Waiting in the River between Worlds is a collection of messages from Korean transnational adoptees to their imagined birth families. Viewers are invited to listen through rotary telephones to these intimate messages recorded in South Korea and the United States at hospitals, homes for single mothers, door steps, and other personally significant locations.

Through this community process, Nari Baker and 11 other adoptees reach beyond language barriers, geographic distance and time past to explore the intersections of truth and fantasy, the human and spirit world.

 

 

(my goal is to do this for American Indian Adoptees next year…Lara)