Blog Bonus: Emvpanyv: One who tells a story | hanging re-enactment | Go Fighting Hamsters! | Trump Termination

Emvpanyv: One who tells a story (MNN File Photo)

Editorial – “Go Fighting Hamsters!” Gary Fife, Radio Communications Specialist

Editor’s Note: The following column contains strong language.

OKMULGEE, Okla.— Ever notice the phrase “federally recognized tribes” when it comes to identifying who is and who isn’t an Indian. If your tribe is not on the list, published by the BIA— (some say ‘Boss Indians Around’) in the Federal Register, then it could mean the differences between receiving services or not, funding or not, having a CDIB (Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood) card or even entering art shows.

Well, the BIA finally got around to publishing that list, like they’re supposed to according to law.  567.  That’s the number of tribes having this political (political, not racial) relationship with the U.S. government.  Now, if you are wondering where all these tribes are, a good many of them are Alaska Native Villages, recognized as local units of government—tribes.  From the Absentee Shawnee of Oklahoma, to the Yupiit of Andreafski in Alaska, to the Zuni Tribe of New Mexico, we’re all good Indians, right?

Here’s what the feds said: “This notice publishes the current list of 567 tribal entities recognized and eligible for funding and services from the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) by virtue of their status as Indian Tribes.  The list is updated from the notice published on May 4, 2016 (81 FR 26826).” And…if just have to see for yourself:

Publication Date: 01/17/2017

Agencies: Bureau of Indian Affairs

Document Type: Notice

Document Citation: 82 FR 4915

Page: 4915-4920 (6 pages)

Agency/Docket Number: 178A2100DD/AAKC001030/A0A501010.999900253G (that’s a long one, huh?)

Document Number: 2017-00912

I guess if your tribe ain’t on it, you’re outta luck.

The emotional battle of an Indian child’s parental custody like Baby Veronica won’t be repeated, according to national news sources.  Recently, the U.S. Supreme Court turned down an effort to hear a case involving a Native American girl who was ordered removed from a California foster home and reunited with relatives in Utah. “Lexi,” who is part Choctaw, was 6-years-old when she was taken from her foster home near Los Angeles under terms of the Indian Child Welfare Act.

From the “I Can’t Believe This Happened” category:

“Public hanging of Native man re-enactment sparks outrage.”

The Historical Society of Hanna’s Town, Pennsylvania actors performed a public execution re-enactment of the hanging of Mamachtaga to an enthusiastic crowd.

‘Indian Country Today’ reported Jan. 7, the Westmoreland County Historical Society re-enacted the 1785 public hanging of the Native man at the town.

The Indian news outlet reported for the first time in the society’s history, the celebration coordinators chose to re-enact a public hanging, this time of Mamachtaga, a Delaware man convicted of murder in 1785.  A video of the public hanging was posted on YouTube June 26, 2016.  The video shows several children in the audience watching as men dressed in colonial dress hang a red-face painted ‘Mamachtaga.’ Several people, presumably re-enactors, shouted comments such as, “Dirty no good Indian deserves to be hung,” and “Murderers, that’s all that they are.”

Several people expressed outrage over the video in Facebook comments. “This is horrible,” commented one. “What is wrong with people? Letting their kids watch this s***! Nothing like family bigotry,” was also commented.

Many people have contacted both the Westmoreland County Historical Society and the volunteer group who participated in the re-enactment to let them know of their opposition to such depictions. ‘Indian Country Today’ says, “According to them, the issue of race did not enter into the re-enactment.  Asked if the group would have done a similar performance if the criminal had been African American they said, ‘Yes.’ “Although the matter is under discussion, the committee doubted that the hanging would be included in next year’s Frontier Court Re-enactment Days celebrations.

Let’s hope not or what? The public hanging of Native men is still a spectator sport?

Let’s change the subject and mood.

Remember last year when I mentioned that a ritzy East Coast college was changing its mascot? “Lord Jeff” had been the mascot for Amherst College in Massachusetts. In the 1700s, he was the guy that suggested using smallpox infected blankets on the local Native people to get rid of them.  The national mood to change sports team’s mascots motivated the school to make the change and several new ideas came to mind.  The Amherst Facebook page reported in December a big list of names was submitted, and then pared down to about 30.  One of them (and my favorite) was the ‘Hamsters.’

Could you imagine at some athletic competition when the team makes its appearance, it’s led by a squad of beautiful ‘Hamster-ette’ cheerleaders and they come out of a big HabiTrail plastic tube?

Nibble em’, nibble em’. Go Fighting Hamsters!

Tafvmpuce! Wild onion season’s not too far off! Ready for the dinners?

Hompvks Ce.

Source: Emvpanyv: One who tells a story – Mvskoke Media

[Shortly after the posting of this article on Indian Country Today, the original video noted in this story was taken off of YouTube due to the public outcry.  Also, Chief Chester L. Brooks  of the Delaware Tribe of Indians located in Bartlesville, OK issued a strongly worded request for the video to be taken down, and the letter, which demanded immediate action from the Westmoreland County Historical Society of Pennsylvania to stop the reenactment, and expressed the tribe’s outrage that the historical society would go beyond the bounds of decency, also demanded an apology and that the removal of the video should be completed within ten days. READ THIS ENTIRE ARTICLE.]

List of sports team names and mascots derived from indigenous People …

Colleges and universities

Secondary schools

***

Federally recognized tribes should brace for possible termination policy under Trump

Whether we like it or not, Saglutupiaġataq (“the compulsive liar” in Iñupiatun) is now president of the United States and Republicans control Congress. Federally recognized Alaska Native and American Indian tribes should brace for the worst, including the possibility that Congress may move to terminate federally recognized tribes.

https://sokokisojourn.wordpress.com/2017/03/24/federally-recognized-tribes-should-brace-for-possible-termination-policy-under-trump/comment-page-1/#comment-436

Pequot in New Zealand | Signing The Treaty of Waitangi | New Zealand history | Native Land Court

By Lara Trace Hentz

When I was editor of the Pequot Times in Connecticut, we had a visit from a Maori woman descended from Peter George. It was fascinating to meet her!

Here is a look at this interesting and devastating history…

 

Illustration of whalemen by Francis Allyn Olmsted. Gen MSS Vol 151, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Yale University.

A Pequot in New Zealand?

Geomap: Peter George, Mashantucket Pequot Whaler

This story map is about Peter George, an American Indian whaleman, citizen of the Mashantucket Pequot Tribe, and part of a whaling and seafaring dynasty that emerged from the Mashantucket Pequot Reservation in second half of the eighteenth century.

Peter was born in 1805, in the midst of social, political, and religious upheaval, and knew at an early age that there was little opportunity for the Pequots who remained on the tiny reservation in southeastern Connecticut. ,Like his father, uncle, and old brother, Peter went to New London and found work as a mariner. Peter’s seafaring career began by the time he was twenty-one years old and continued until he was nearly fifty.  He was on eight known whaling voyages, bringing him to whaling grounds of the Falkland Islands, sometimes refered to as the ”Brazil Banks,” the south Atlantic, or “East Cape” of New Zealand, and the Pacific Ocean.

Between his voyages, Peter married twice, had children, built a house, and was involved in tribal affairs. Later in his life he was called “Captain” Peter George, an acknowledgement of a life spent at sea. Peter died at his home on the reservation in the summer of 1861 at the age of 56.

Story Chapters

  1. 1. 1805 – Peter George, Son of Peter and Polly
  2. 2. 1819 – “As Long as Wood Grows and the Water Runs”
  3. 3. 1826 – False Accusations
  4. 4. 1827 – The Port of New London
  5. 5. 1832 – Work and Marriage
  6. 6. 1831-1833 – Dirty Work
  7. 7. 1832-1833 – Whaling Off the Coast of New Zealand
  8. 8. 1833-1834 – At Home on Mashantucket
  9. 9. 1834 – Return to the Sea on the Ship Neptune
  10. 10. 1839-1842 – Incidents On A Whaling Voyage
  11. 11. 1848-1852 – Falkland Islands and New Goods from a Deserter
  12. 12. 1849-1852 – The Giants of Patagonia
  13. 13. 1856 – Pequot Land Sale
  14. 14. 1857 – Suing the Overseer for Tribal Membership
  15. 15. 1861 – Peter’s Death
  16. 16. 1913 – Peter’s Legacy

Printable Version

Peter George, Mashantucket Pequot Whaler

Chapter 1

Peter George, Son of Peter and Polly

1805; Mashantucket, CT

In 1805, Polly Apes George, the wife of Peter George, gave birth to their second son, Peter. At the time of young Peter’s birth, several Pequot families had just finished their move to Brothertown, New York as part of a religious migration. Peter’s father (also Peter) and uncle, Benjamin George, who were considered among the “Cheifs and Councellors” of the Pequot Tribe, remained at Mashantucket with their families.  Providing for their families was challenging as reservation lands continued to shrink.  There were opportunities off the reservation and most Pequot men, including elder Peter and Benjamin, went to New London to find work as mariners.

Chapter 2

“As Long as Wood Grows and the Water Runs”

1819; Old State House, Hartford, CT

After several Pequot leaders removed to Brothertown, the State of Connecticut appointed overseers began to manage the affairs of the tribe, as Indian people were widely viewed by whites as unable to do so.  Though in practice earlier, the system was formalized in 1821.  These men were required to manage the rent of tribal land, the accounting of provisons and other necessities allocated to tribal members, and to maintain a list of tribal member names.  Problems with the white overseers at Mashantucket led to a string of petitions by members of the Pequot Tribe to remove corrupt and opportunistic men as their “guardians” and replace them with more honorable people.

 

Chapter 3

False Accusations

1826; New London, CT – Courthouse

While his brother Peleg was away (possibly at sea), Peter was accused of an adulterous relationship with his brother’s wife, Lucretia.  The complaint was brought by a member of one of the families renting Pequot land.  A warrant was issued and Peter was arrested and brought before the local justice of the peace.  Several in the Pequot communicty served as witnesses in the case and Peter was eventually found “Not Guilty in manner and Form as is alleged.”  It is unclear what precipitated this false accusation, but many of the overseers and neighbors of the Pequot engaged in retaliatory activities following Pequot complaints to the General Assembly.  In one instance, an outgoing overseer provided a list of people in the tribe and all members of the Goerge family were excluded.

Chapter 4

The Port of New London

1827; New London, CT Waterfrong

New London’s whaling fleet grew rapidly during the 1820’s and signing on board of a whaler meant good pay for a successful voyage.  Peter was already considered a “seaman” by the time he departed for his first known whaling voyage in October 1827 aboard the ship Friends.  He was about 5’7 1/2″ tall and identified by various customs officals as “dark,” “yellow,” and “Indian.”  Working on a whaler was physically demanding.  In port, preparation involved loading ballast and stocking the ship with supplies for the hunt as well as the food and water necessary for long periods of time at sea.  At sea, men climbed rigging to raise and lower sails, maintaining and repairing sails, ropes, and deck areas.  Although there is no record of Peter’s official position, we know from records that his brother was a cooper. Might Peter have also held this position?

The image above shows a scrimshawed sperm whale tooth, carved with image of the ship Friends.  Script below sea reads: “Friends of New London Chaseing Whales.”

 

Chapter 5

Work and Marriage

1832; “North Groton” / Ledyard

On May 2, 1832, Peter George married Lucy Fagins, an Eastern Pequot from North Stonington.  On that same day he boarded the ship Palladium of New London, bound for the East Cape (New Zealand).  This situation was a typical one for whaling wives and families as fathers, husbands, brothers and sons often left home for months and even years.

Chapter 6

Dirty Work

1831-1833; Off the Coast of New Zealand

Although we do not know exactly what Peter’s position was on the ship Palladium, we do know that whaling was dangerous and dirty work.  Peter most likely joined the rest of the crew in small whaleboats like the model pictured. The crew would chase the whale and use a harpoon and killing lance to capture and eventually kill it.  The whale would then be towed back to the ship, where it was “cut in” and “tried out.”  The oil rentered from the whale was an importnant source of lighting in the 19th Century.

Chapter 7

Whaling Off the Coast of New Zealand

1832-1833; Off the Coast of New Zealand

This was Peter’s second voyage on the Palladium as it returned to the East Cape whaling grounds off the coast of New Zealand.  Peter left New London this time with a familiar face, that of his cousin Solomon Apes.  Only a few vessels had noted this particular destination prior to the Palladium visits.  This time period coincided with increased European and American interaction with and settlement amongst the Maori tribes of New Zealand.  By 1840, the Treaty of Waitangi (New Zealand’s founding document) had been crafted, which quickly resulted in escalating tension over land rights.

The year before the treaty was signed, Elisha Apes (Solomon’s brother), a crew member of the New London whaler Ann Maria, mutinied off the coast of New Zealand over the captain’s abuse of the ship’s boy.  Eventually, an agreement was made and Apes put ashore at Port Otago.  Soon after, he married a local Ngai Tahu woman and they had many children. Apes and his children were active in Maori land claims and some were well known sheep shearers and shore whalers. Most of Apes’ decendants remain in New Zealand to this day.

Apes never left New Zealand, but did his whaling relatives ever visit?

Chapter 8

At Home on Mashantucket

1833-1834; Off Shewville Road, Mashantucket, CT

Peter remained at Mashantucket for nearly two and a half years and was noted in a December 1833 tribal census — “age 28, part white.”  During his stay, he planned to build a house, but for unknown reasons, he sold the timber intended for that purpose.  Eventually, in early 1834, the tribal overseer commissioned a house to be built for Peter in the northwestern part of the Mashantucket Pequot Reservation.

Chapter 9

Return to the Sea on the Ship Neptune

1834; South Atlantic Ocean

In June 1834, Peter returned to sea – fittingly – aboard the ship Neptune of New London on a whaling voyage to the South Atlantic.  Peter’s cousin, Elisha Apes, as well as Isaac Hazard (a Narragansett Indian) and Thomas Smith (a Mohegan Indian) were also aboard the nearly two-year voyage.  Soon after his departure, a daughter, Lucy Ann George was born.

Chapter 10

Incidents On A Whaling Voyage

1839-1842; Galapagos Islands

By age 34, Peter was a seasoned whaleman having been on at least five whaling voyages.  For eight years, he would only be on the land between voyages for a total of thirteen months.  It is clear that the sea had become home.  During this time, in October 1839, he joined the crew of the bark ship North America of New London along with George Cotrell (also Mashantucket Pequot), and John Uncas (a Mohegan).  Headed to the Pacific Ocean, the voyage would last for two and a half years.

On this voyage was a young Yale graduate, Francis Allyn Olmsted – a passenger and observer- on his way to a warmer Pacific climate to relieve a chronic illness.  Olmstead kept a journal on board that he later published in 1841 as “Incidents on a Whaling Voyage.”

Peter and his crewmates would have seen or participated in nearly everything that Olmsted recorded and illustrated, including the sea chanties Ho, Ho, and Up She Rises and Nancy Fanana.  (To hear these songs, look for the two chanties on side bar, under Related Resources.)

Chapter 11

Falkland Islands and New Goods from a Deserter

1848-1852; Falkland Islands

On November 3, 1848, Peter George was among the crew of the ship Hudson with his nephew, Amos W. George, and Peter Babcock (Mashantucket Pequot), as it departed Mystic.  Marine journals report that the Hudson was bound for the Falkland Islands on a whaling voyage.  Though no crew list or logbook has been located for this voyage, other documents inform us of events that took place on board the vessel.

A little more than a year into the voyage, one of the crewmembers deserted the vessel, leaving behind all of his belongings.  Subsequently, an auction of his possessions was conducted and a list created as “An Account of Articles Sold At Auction Belonging to J.M. Oat – Found After his Disertion, December 30th 1849.”  The items purchased by Peter George were one duck frock and a dictionary; by Amos George, one pair duck pants, one pair of boots, one flint, and a lot of books and tracts; by Peter Babcock, one vest, one pair of duck pants, one flannel shirt, twenty four heads of tobacco and one bottle.

Chapter 12

The Giants of Patagonia

1849-1852; Puerto San Julian, Argentina

Later in the voyage, while at “Port Santa Cruz” (now Puerto San Julian, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina) with its “tender,” schooner Washington, the ship Hudson welcomed aboard for nearly a month, Benjamin F. Bourne.  Bourne, who was a mate aboard the New Bedford schooner John Allyne earlier in 1849, had just escaped 97 days of captivity with the Indians of Patagonia.  The accounts he shared with the crew of the Hudson soon made it into wider newspaper circulation around the Atlantic.  His account was such a sensation that in 1853, he published a book about his experiences called The Giants of Patagonia.

This was Peter’s last confirmed voyage.  He may have been on part of another voyage on the ship Kensington out of New Bedford, and his absence between May 1853 and January 1855, might suggest such a scenario.  He was also on town expense in Groton for unknown reasons, so he may have taken ill after his return on the Hudson.

Chapter 13

Pequot Land Sale

1856; Mashantucket, CT

In 1855, the Connecticut General Assembly appointed a committee to investigate the condition of the “Pequot Indians of Ledyard.”  They reported that there were but thirteen tribal members, living in five houses dispersed across some 900 acres:  mostly females – “some quite aged” while others “had chosen Negroes for companions.”

The committee reported that “it is not presumption to suppose, judging from the past, that they will soon become extinct” and recommended that some 700 acres of Mashantucket be surveyed, subdivided, and sold at public auction, with the proceeds going into a fund for tribal support.  The remaining 179 acres would be designated as a “reservation for the use and benefit of Indians.”  The General Assembly passed an act in June 1855, authorizing the land sale.  Pequots, including “Capt. Peter George,” twice submitted a petition to the General Assembly protesting Connecticut’s illegal sale of tribal land.

Chapter 14

Suing the Overseer for Tribal Membership

1857; Courthouse, New London, CT

After the Pequot Land Sale, some tribal families were denied rights as citizens of Mashantucket and prevented from accessing tribal resources.  Outraged, tribal members sued the overseer in April 1857 for the acknowledgement of their rights.  Peter George, his sister Sally George Babcock, and her children were among the plantiffs.  Following testimony in which they provided a genealogical history of their family, the New London Superior Court resolved the suit in their favor.

This was significant, as access to tribal resources mattered more than ever.  Now in his 50s, Peter was aging, and after many years at sea, he had returned to the land.  Living on the land and no longer earning a seaman’s lay must have been somewhat foreign to Peter.  He was now cohabitating with another Pequot, Caroline Wheeler, and after the court case, began to recieve the benefits of tribal resources including access to cash for necessities, meat, potatoes, and dairy products in the winter, and seed corn, beans, and guano for fertilizer in the spring for planting.  Clothing, supplies and shoes were also provided.

Chapter 15

Peter’s Death

1861; Tribal Cemetery, Mashantucket, CT

At the outbreak of the Civil War in early 1861, many Pequots were still whaling in the Pacific Ocean.  At home, Peter was sick.  On Febrary 6th, a doctor went to the reservation “for attendance and medicine for Peter George.”  In late May, the tribal overseer visited him.  By August 4th, Peter died.  He was 56 years old.  Caroline’s daughter, Jane Wheeler, went “to Norwich after Coffin for Peter and notifying friends” of his death.  Though no marked stone identifies his burial location, Peter was likely interred at the tribal burying ground known as “Peter’s Hill Cemetery.”

Chapter 16

Peter’s Legacy

1913; Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History

In 1913, Yale Peabody Museum anthropologist, George Grant MacCurdy, visited the Pequots at Mashantucket.  While there, he purchased from Jane Wheeler a whalebone handled knife.  Who made this knife?  Did Jane inherit the knife from her mother and Peter?  Did it come from another Pequot whaleman?  What other objects did Pequot whalemen like Peter leave behind?

Perhaps the whalebone handled knife went along with stories like this:

“My grandmother [Elizabeth George Plouffe] would tell us stories about how Pequots at one time were whalers, and this was even during the time the reservation was there and they used to come down here to Mystic and they used to go aboard the old whaling ships, like the Charles W. Morgan . . . and they would go out to sea.  Sometimes they would be gone for three, six months and sometimes a year at a time.  And then the Pequots would come back and they would (in the area after they’d finished their whaling voyage and then come back to the reservation), they would go back to the house, because it was the center of activity.  And in those days they called the old house “the beehive.”  And they would come back with their stories, and my grandmother said she could remember some of these stories from the time when she was a child, that her mother [Martha Hoxie] used to tell her because her mother was a child at that time.  Martha Hoxie used to tell my grandmother how that when she was a kid when the men would come back from the whaling voyages and sometimes, well, oftentimes they’d bring back their bottles with ’em, and they would sit around jawing about their experiences, they’d get a little tipsy.  And they’d get started getting a little loud and my great-grandmother, Martha Hoxie, would get a little nervous because she was a kid at the time, about their being loud and whatnot and she would run underneath her mother’s [Jane Wheeler] hoop skirt and hide.  That was her place of refuge.” – Richard A. “Skip” Hayward, 1995

Related Resources

Historical Background:  The Treaty of Waitangi (Māori: Tiriti o Waitangi) is a treaty first signed on 6 February 1840 by representatives of the British Crown and various Māori chiefs from the North Island of New Zealand. It resulted in the declaration of British sovereignty over New Zealand by Lieutenant Governor William Hobson in May 1840.

Interactive reproduction of the 1840 Waikato-Manukau copy of the Treaty of Waitangi

SEE: Waikato-Manukau treaty copy | NZHistory, New Zealand history online

Those who explained the treaty to Māori generally stressed the advantages of bringing British settlers under the control of the Crown, which some chiefs had been asking for since 1831. They played down the impact of the British acquisition of sovereignty and its likely consequences for Māori. Missionary assurances that the treaty would be of benefit to Māori probably helped to overcome the caution of many chiefs. Some chiefs, especially in Northland, saw the treaty as a sacred bond or covenant directly between themselves and Queen Victoria. Many who signed were devout Christians who made no distinction between the Crown and the teachings of Christianity. Many Māori had clear expectations of how they would benefit.  A sharing of authority would enhance chiefly mana. The country would be protected from acquisition by other foreign powers. A kawana (governor) would control Europeans, especially those buying land, who were causing trouble in some areas. The treaty would bring settlement, and with it both more markets for essential Māori services and desired trade goods.

Some chiefs realised that change was inevitable. The clock could not be turned back; the treaty was a way into the future.

Source: Signing the treaty – Treaty signatories and signing locations | NZHistory, New Zealand history online

Native Land Court created, 30 October 1865

Native Land Court at Ahipara (Alexander Turnbull Library, 1/2-026780; F)

 

The Native Land Court was one of the key products of the 1865 Native Lands Act. It provided for the conversion of traditional communal landholdings into individual titles, making it easier for Pākehā to purchase Māori land.

Coming little more than a year after the Waikato War, this legislation was to achieve what many believed had not been accomplished on the battlefield – acquiring the land necessary to satisfy an insatiable settler appetite. The operations of the Land Court affected Māori more than those of any other colonial institution. When old rivalries were played out in court, the ultimate beneficiaries were Pākehā.  Historian Judith Binney described the Native Lands Act as an ‘act of war’.

The Court was required to name no more than 10 owners, regardless of the size of a block.  All other tribal members were effectively dispossessed.  The newly designated owners held their lands individually, not communally as part of (or trustees for) a tribal group.  They could manage it, and sell it, as individuals and for their own benefit.

The first chief judge of the Court, Francis Fenton, maintained that judgements could only be based on evidence before the Court – so all claimants had to attend, whether they wanted to or not. Many Māori racked up large legal bills as a consequence. Those coming from out of town also faced the costs of food and accommodation. Lawyers, shopkeepers, surveyors and the like granted Māori credit while they awaited the outcome of their case. These expenses forced many Māori to sell the land they had been defending in order to settle their debts.

This process of alienating Māori land concerned some settler politicians. Former Attorney-General Henry Sewell had protested against the government’s policy of confiscating the land of Māori deemed to be ‘in rebellion’. Back in office in 1865, he asserted that the Native Land Court was designed to:

destroy if possible, the principle of communism which ran through the whole of their institutions, upon which their social system was based, and which stood as a barrier in the way of all attempts to amalgamate the Native race into our own social and political system.

Māori landholdings declined dramatically in the late 19th century. Between 1870 and 1892, 2 million ha of Māori land was transferred to Pākehā ownership. Whereas at the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840 Māori owned almost all of the North Island, by 1892 they owned little more than a third, and a quarter of this was leased to Pākehā. Another 1.2 million ha of Māori land would be sold by 1900.

Source

I am also sharing another post of Maori photos… and an art exhibit about this.

WE ARE NATIVE WOMEN – 23rd March to 31st May 2017 – Rainmaker Gallery

 

Her Empire is Her Reality, Sierra Edd

“Dooming a person’s existence to that of a stereotype is worse than never having lived at all.”


Shan Goshorn

The artworks in this exhibition depict women of all ages, strong, powerful, nurturing, caring, desirable, provocative, dangerous, real and supernatural. It highlights individual and communal struggles, concerns and life choices of women from several Native cultures across the continent.

“From a very young age, Chemehuevi women are taught that their innate strength as a woman and life giver is all-powerful, maybe sometimes even supernatural, and we are respected as equals in Chemehuevi society. We hold power in government and historically in battle. This unique perspective shows up throughout my art. It is always my intention to visualize this inherent Chemehuevi belief in the all-powerful, supernatural strength of women.” Cara Romero

Featured artists include Cara Romero (Chemehuevi), Shan Goshorn (Cherokee), Marla Allison (Laguna Pueblo), Shelley Niro (Mohawk), Kali Spitzer (Kaska Dena & Jewish) and Zoe Urness (Tlingit & Cherokee), Alison Bremner (Tlingit), Sierra Edd (Navajo/Diné) and Debra Yepa-Pappan (Jemez Pueblo & Korean).

Source: WE ARE NATIVE WOMEN – 23rd March to 31st May 2017 – Rainmaker Gallery

Last year’s exhibit

Why an Apache Artist’s Photos Are Inextricable from His Activism | What the people of the Amazon know that you don’t | TED Talk

Standing Fox, a leader of the Apache Stronghold movement, talks about how activism plays an important part in his life as an Apache artist.

What do you hope to communicate to non-Indians through your work?

Standing Fox, “Untitled”

SF: I think that the people in the US tend to forget how rich the culture is on this land. A lot of people go out of this country to volunteer and help other people in need. I want them to know that there are issues in their backyard, on their land. I think it’s very important to know who the original people are here, and to have respect for them. We need help too. I want to show the beauty within this land. I want people to see more than just images of Indians protesting, more than an Indian on Instagram holding up a picture of a poster saying WE ARE STILL HERE. We of course have to do this in order for us to protect the culture and the way, but I feel that it is my job to push the beauty of our culture to the world, by saying this is what we are about, and this is what we are trying to protect.

Source: Why an Apache Artist’s Photos Are Inextricable from His Activism

***What the people of the Amazon know that you don’t

This lost Native language of Massachusetts is waking up again | What is Bermuda’s Connection to the Pequot

This lost Native language of Massachusetts is waking up again

READ: This lost Native language of Massachusetts is waking up again PRI´s The World | First Nations Blog – FIRST NATIONS

AND THIS:

By Lara Trace Hentz  (She Covers the Trail)

AQUAY!  Hello, greetings to you in Pequot!  BERMUDA Greeting :: Yo Ace Boy! (Hello good friend!)

This blog still has the theme:  “What you’re not supposed to know” (regarding cracking open Indian history, especially here in New England.)

I have also used this headline:

I don’t know why we don’t know this stuff

It’s heinous how the historic narrative calls American Indians/Native Americans “disappeared, the vanished, relics of the past,” but you will see in these stories, tribes do manage to survive every attempt to erase them and their culture, language and history right here in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

(above video) Jessie Little Doe’s work has helped revitalize and resurrect the Wampanoag language.  I interviewed her many years ago.  What was almost lost forever has been re-claimed, thanks to Jessie.

I blogged here in 2011 about Brinky Tucker who is a historian and descendant of the New England Indians who were sold into slavery into Bermuda.  He authored “St. David’s Island, Bermuda, Its People, History and Culture” – published in 2009, (not on Amazon – but it should be!)  The history of Bermuda involves slavery of Indigenous people… [Book cover, top photo: Tall Oak Weeden (Wampanoag-Pequot) and Brinky Tucker (Bermuda Indian)]. See: Brinky Tucker on Bermuda Indian History

BACK STORY: …relative isolation lasted until the 1930s, when a bridge was constructed connecting St. David’s Island with the rest of Bermuda.  Although there was intermarriage and cohabitation with African slaves, European colonists, and imported Carib Indians, these descendants of New England tribes passed on “origin stories” that connect five St. David’s families, stories about an Indian slave woman named Susannah who claimed to be the granddaughter of King Phillip and traditions of chanting and drumming at a hillside location called Dark Bottom.  After the 1834 emancipation, most former slaves stayed on St. David’s and continued to intermarry with each other.

“Most of the St. David’s Islanders today are of mixed blood,” says St. Clair Tucker, or Brinky, as he prefers to be called, one of the founding members of the St. David’s Island Indian Committee. “The first Indian slave arrived on our shores in 1616, and for the next 200 years the English developed a very profitable slave trade with Africans and Native Americans. Documents prepared by the English indicate that Pequots, Wampanoags, Narragensetts, Cherokees, Mohegans, Carib, Arowacks and Indians from Central and South America were sold here.  The only trading port was in St. George’s, about 150 yards from St. David’s….”

In 2002, the Mashantucket Pequot had ceremony to reconnect with their enslaved ancestors, their brothers and sisters found in Bermuda.  Brinky and family members came to Connecticut to meet their Pequot cousins (that’s when I met him) and the next year the Pequot traveled to Bermuda.  Making this connection made new history and friendships that continue to this day.

For decades, tribal culture is its own power and lives in the blood, and shows itself in song, dance and language.

When I spoke with Brinky, he’d met with Pequot tribal council who asked simply, “What do you want?” You might guess the world’s richest tribe was skeptical at first of this history connection.  That is the worrisome part.  Tribes themselves are often unaware of the slavery and mixing that happened in prior centuries, even in Bermuda.

Then-Chairman Michael J. Thomas, a Mashantucket tribal leader, went to St. David’s Island in Bermuda to reconnect with Brinky and other Bermuda Indians.

Brinky told the Bermuda newspaper:

“The Native American involvement in Bermuda over the years has been very significant,” he said. “They weren’t always well treated. Some of the stories aren’t pleasant, but it’s better that we know our history.”

He added that the English colonists who originally enslaved the Pequot Indians might well be surprised that their descendants are now celebrating their links to a troubled time. “The English kept great records,” he said. “Little did they know that we’d read them.”

 THEY LOOKED LIKE US
from MANY HOOPS

St. David’s was completely isolated in those early days; in fact, it remained accessible only by boat until as late as 1934.

Beginning around 1616 Wampanoag, Pequots, Narragansetts, Cherokees, Mohegans, Carib, Arowacks and Indians from Central and South America were sold in Bermuda.

“Tall Oak” Weeden and a delegation of Wampanoag Indians and Mashantucket Pequots went in search of their people from the slavery era.

They traveled to St. David’s Island in Bermuda.  There they met a small clan claiming to be descended from New England Indian slaves shipped to the island centuries ago.  Weeden’s group was convinced it was true when they saw the faces, dances and ceremonies of the St. David’s Indians.

“I was struck by how much they looked like us,” said Michael J. Thomas, a Mashantucket tribal leader.

According to local legend, the wife and son of King Philip might have been among those on St. David’s.  After the king’s death, his wife, Wootonekanuske, is said to have married an African.  This kept alive the genealogical line with Indians in New England. The Pequots plan to dig even further into slavery’s hidden history, Thomas said.  “What’s to be learned is a more accurate perception of Colonial-era history,” he said. “It helps people to understand our insecurities of today.”

If you are into history, here is a link to a short paper about Bermuda’s Native American DNA ancestry. HERE

From Restless Natives, from the Bermuda newspaper THE BERMUDIAN here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Pequot War of 1634 to 1638 saw the English colonists of Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay join forces with the Narragansett and Mohegan tribes in an attempt to unseat the Pequot, who enjoyed economic and political power in what is now southeastern Connecticut.

“The colonists has guns,” Tucker said.  “The Indians had bow and arrows.”

Captain Anthony White, the largest landowner in Bermuda at the time, purchased these 80 Native Americans. They were sent to live on St. David’s Island and put to work as farmers, boat builders, labourers and fishermen. From that point, the connection between Native Americans and St. David’s was established- and aided, over the following years, by the island’s close proximity to the local slave market.

“When they were brought here, the trading port was St. George’s,” Tucker explained. “Slaves were sold in the square, and masters from St. George’s and St. David’s got the first pick.”

*** Virtual: St David

On the island of St David, a cultural mishmash represents the diversity of Bermudian culture.  The Carter House is a testament to the varied groups of people who settled here, exploring the history of the English, black West Indians, Spaniards, Portuguese, Native Americans and even Scottish and Irish prisoners of war (carterhousemuseum.org).

 

P.S. I left the Pequot Times in 2004.  (I quit and moved to Massachusetts).  The monthly newspaper continued barely another year and then folded.  Massive layoffs by the Pequot Tribal Government shut it down.  That was a huge loss for the tribe and for Connecticut…. and for history.

Melissa, Medicine Woman for the Mohegan tribe, named me “She Covers the Trail.”  My Native friend English professor poet Ron Welburn keeps in close contact with Brinky and has visited him.  Brinky and I exchange Christmas cards.

ojibwe_style_moccasi_cover_for_kindleP.S.S.– If you have any interest in Native authors (and you should), go visit www.bluehandbooks.org – we just published Ojibwe Style Moccasin Game, a handbook by Charles Grolla on how to play the oldest Ojibwe game, given to man by makwa (bear.)

***VERY IMPORTANT

“Who Belongs?” in Indian Country Conference Convenes March 9–10, 2017  TUCSON, ARIZONA – The “Who Belongs? From Tribal Kinship to Native Nation Citizenship to Disenrollment…

READ: A First: Tribal Leaders, Academics to Convene to Discuss Tribal Disenrollment – Native News Online

“First Daughter and the Black Snake” Lights the Path

LA PROGRESSIVE’s Dick Price wrote: Besides being a masterfully conceived, thoroughly engaging film, what makes “First Daughter” so moving is the heartening solution it offers in these dark times.

There are two videos at this link…

READ: “First Daughter and the Black Snake” Lights the Path – LA Progressive

Speechmaking: Talk of the Nation – BackStory with the American History Guys

It’s 150 years since Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address – so we’re taking a tour of some of the highs, and lows, of American speechmaking, and asking what makes some in endure.

Guests Include:

American school students read speeches by Indians?  Americans needed redemption about Indians?

A MUST LISTEN: Talk of the Nation – BackStory with the American History Guys

From Around the Web

Speechmaking by 60sScoop (top photo) Ottawa

FAA Complicity in Violence Against Standing Rock Water Protectors #NoDAPL

 

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Protector efforts to thwart the development of the pipeline has been met with violence and surveillance by police. In order to track the Water Protectors, police and Energy Transfer Partners use helicopters, planes, and drones to photograph, monitor and harass. In some cases, the helicopters are used for more direct action against Water Protectors.

dsc-0126-jpg-1484939637This nine-part series will illuminate the FAA’s complacency and the role the FAA’s concession played in the violence against Water Protectors. A listing of the other eight articles is at the bottom of this article.

READ: FAA Complicity in Violence Against Standing Rock Water Protectors – Native News Online

UPDATES:

The number of arrests surpassed 600 this week, as 16 were arrested Monday and Tuesday in confrontations near the camp.

The Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux also are fighting the pipeline work in court, with the next hearing set for Feb. 28. In the meantime, hundreds of pipeline opponents have continued to occupy a camp near the drilling site in North Dakota.

State and federal authorities have told the few hundred people remaining in the camp to leave by Wednesday (today). Authorities want the area cleaned and closed before spring floodwaters wash tons of trash and debris into nearby rivers, including the Missouri River, and cause an environmental disaster.

The tribe launched a cleanup effort in late January. The state and Corps were continuing Friday to try to line up additional contractors to speed up the work, according to Corps Capt. Ryan Hignight and Mike Nowatzki, spokesman for Gov. Doug Burgum.

“We’re running out of time,” Hignight said. “We need to ensure that the land is remediated as soon as possible.”

Some in camp think the flood fears are overblown and that authorities are trying to turn public sentiment against them.

“We’re all working hard to get the lower (flood-prone) grounds clear,” said Giovanni Sanchez, a Pennsylvania man who has been at the camp since November. “I think they’re just trying to find any reason to get us out of here.”

The latest spring flood outlook from the National Weather Service, issued Thursday, calls for minor flooding in the area. The outlook doesn’t include flood risks associated with river ice jams, which can’t be predicted.

[SOURCE]

Nazi loot | Art Theft Crackdown | “Cultural Property” | Repatriation

The maker of baking products, muesli and pizza, promises to return any plundered art to heirs of Jewish owners

READ: German baker Dr Oetker finds possible Nazi loot in company art collection

Returns of cultural property

Under the 1970 UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property, Canada has returned the following cultural property to its country of origin since 1997

Cree artist Kent Monkman says the title of his exhibit “Shame and Prejudice” reflects the “harsh” experiences of indigenous peoples in Canada over the last 150 years.  The show opened recently in Toronto then will tour the country.

Source: Video: Art show delves into Canada’s treatment of indigenous peoples – The Globe and Mail

Tip of the iceburg

Tip leads police to long-missing pieces by famed Quebec artist in Montreal home, but underworld art trade is widespread and international

Source: Recovery of three stolen Riopelle paintings just tip of iceberg – The Globe and Mail

By LT

Hi everyone,

I wanted to share the Smoke Signals sculpture (blurry top photo) by  Allan Houser (Apache) on display at the Mashantucket Pequot’s casino Foxwoods.  The tribe has amassed a huge collection of art.  Why?  They could afford it, being the world’s richest tribe, and they wanted to preserve a variety of Native American artworks, and support the artist and his or her family…  The trickle-down theory is traditional practice in Indian Country.  When I worked for them, our newspaper staff had a tour of the paintings and sculptures at the casino and at the Pequot Museum.  It was incredible.

Art has huge value! As you can see, it’s a victim of trafficking, too! Across this planet, ART is vitally important, especially when we live in turbulent times.  With poverty in the majority of tribal communities and in Third Worlds, art can save lives, when someone displays a talent, like painting, or music, or acting.  That talent can be your ticket off the rez, and later, with enough money earned, it’s your ticket back.   Many many cultures send their young adults out to make money so they can send money home…

Found/Acquired: Alberta (Americas,North America,Canada,Alberta) 1850-1900 Acquisition notes Part of the Freeman Collection, a body of material collected c.1900 on the “Blood Reserve”, a Kainai reservation in Alberta, by Frederick and Maude Deane-Freeman. Frederick was a government official charged with distributing rations to the native families, and knew the people he and his wife collected the material from by name. Most of the collection was purchased by the British Museum in 1903 with assistance from Dr. Robert Bell and Lord Minto. This object was originally owned by Red Crow, a noted warrior from the band of Kainai known as Fish Eaters and for many years paramount chief of the Kainai.

Trading art and artifact for money started in colonial times.  Were Native artists paid well?  I seriously doubt it.  Look at the British Museum and you can see how government officials and trading posts made trades with Indians for centuries.  Robbed? Ah, I think so!  Or anthropologists who came in and dug stuff up and called it their own.  Those artifacts are now called “Cultural Property” and some looted countries and tribal nations are calling to get their property returned.  And we know the Nazi stole artworks and the Jews are asking for it back.

Art has value for its history, too.  Art defines who we are as humanity! [This act of getting it back to the original owners is called repatriation.]

In the US, big organizations like the National Endowment of the Arts help fund today’s artists and their communities, which helps tourism, which creates even more value and jobs.  With t-rump, the arts are entering the danger zone:

President Donald Trump sent shockwaves through the art world when it shared its federal budget, which calls for completely scrapping the National Endowment of the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). The president and his pals are evidently blind to the value of art, but as many of us know so well, both agencies have supported countless individuals and organizations with the roughly .004% of the federal budget that each receives annually.

To illustrate just how beneficial the NEA’s work has been, artist and environmental engineer Tega Brain has programmed a website that scrolls through the types of  grants the NEA awarded last year alone. Like end credits of a movie, each funded project moves slowly down your screen in bright colors to form a simple but clear message: we really need the NEA.

https://twitter.com/AttorneyLana/status/827533367432323072

Support artists however and whenever you can…  LT

Last Real Indians | History Snobs ask Why Now? #SlaveryPublicHistory

By LT (wearing my heavy history hat)

My cousin Charlie is saying he’s in the fourth stage of grief – “If we can laugh it means we are in the Kubler-Ross 4th stage.” I do think we need to laugh and cry.

Last weekend I watched a live feed history symposium at Brown University in Rhode Island. First, I was overwhelmed and overcome with information. I took copious notes. I was very pleased how Native American Slavery was talked about, too.  I was happy to see people of color from around the world giving presentations on their own history truths. (I even posted a few photos on Instagram since this was historic!) Then I got so angry. Several things hit me like bricks!

Last Real Indians published my op-ed on Tuesday.

Here it is:

History Snobs ask Why Now? #SlaveryPublicHistory

“The great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us, are unconsciously controlled by it in many ways, and history is literally present in all that we do.” ― James Baldwin, The Price of the Ticket: Collected Nonfiction, 1948-1985

By Trace Lara Hentz for Last Real Indians

This Snobs headline ought to get me a few gasps and new readers. No, I’m not a history snob. I’m a lover. I can’t get enough of what I call His-Story: where/there, when/then, what/that.

I watched (with baited breath) the live feed of the history symposium at Brown University.  Official title: SLAVERY AND GLOBAL PUBLIC HISTORY: New Challenges. It’s about: Universities across the United States and the world have been forced to confront connections to slavery throughout their histories. From Brown to Yale, Oxford and in South Africa, students, faculty, and administrations wrestle with how to expose, conceal, honor, or memorialize the legacies of slavery. LINK: https://www.brown.edu/initiatives/slavery-and-justice/global-public-history/schedule

Continue reading “Last Real Indians | History Snobs ask Why Now? #SlaveryPublicHistory”

After Dakota Access Pipeline Protests, Army Corps Blocks Final Permit, Will Explore Other Routes

The Army Corps of Engineers says it’s denying a permit for building the oil pipeline right above the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. The move comes after months of protests.

Source: After Dakota Access Pipeline Protests, Army Corps Blocks Final Permit, Will Explore Other Routes : The Two-Way : NPR

Top Photo: Veterans from across America from all branches of the United State military celebrated with water protectors on Tuesday afternoon this week.

Artists Join the Fight to Protect Standing Rock

by Erin Joyce at Hyperallergic

In North Dakota and beyond, Native American artists and their allies are creating work in support of the water protectors fighting the Dakota Access Pipeline. Read More →

 

We Are In Crisis from Dylan McLaughlin on Vimeo.

The Secret Path on Remembrance Day

 

From Jay at Assholes Watching Movies:

You may have noticed there was a day this summer when Canada “went dark.” It was August 20th, the day the Tragically  Hip performed for the last time. Hip lead singer, front trudeau-the-hip-concert-kingstonman extraordinaire, Canadian superstar Gord Downie had recently announced that he had a brain tumour and was terminally ill.  Since making music has always been his passion, he and the Hip went on a farewell tour and despite the ravages of cancer, he performed full-throttle at each and every show, somehow finding the energy and the courage to power through.  Their final trudeau-downiedate was in their hometown of Kingston Ontario, just a little ways down the road from Ottawa.  Our Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, was in the front row, and spoke for all of Canada when he thanked Gord and the whole band for their decades of artistic serviced to the country. It was a stirring night. The end is coming for Gord and he knew it, you could see it in his eyes, feel it every time he was overcome by emotion, but instead of making it about him, he chose to use this spotlight (and believe me, about 32 out of our 33 million strong l3z58mkrpopulation were tuned in one way or another) to speak on behalf of Canada’s indigenous population.

Since that night, as Downie inches closer to his final days, he’s still pouring his last energies into speaking up for our Aboriginal people.  His latest endeavor is a tribute to Chanie Wenjack – in music, graphic novel, and animated form.  10 poems were turned into an album, which was turned into a graphic novel, which was turned into an animated film (above).  They all tell the story of one boy, who represents the many, many more just like him, our first nations children ripped from the arms of their mothers, out of their communities, and into residential schools.  Residential schools were run by church and state with the sole purpose of ‘civilizing’ the savages. gord-downie-sheila-north-wilson Prohibited from speaking their languages, practicing their spirituality, or honouring their cultures, teachers stripped them of their identity.  Many children suffered terrible abuse, but all of these kids were deprived of their childhoods, and all of the families suffered terribly as I’m sure you would if your child was removed, perhaps never to be seen again, or if you were lucky enough to be reunited, we can only hope that you can find a common language in which to communicate.  Communities were destroyed in what many Aboriginal people refer to as a genocide.  It’s a dark part of Canadian history that wasn’t acknowledged until very recently.  Today our First Nations peoples often live in poverty and other consequences of this intergenerational tragedy.  Healing is not an Aboriginal problem, it’s something we need to address as an entire country.  Gord Downie is doing his part.

If you are so inclined, The Secret Path can be streamed here for free (or in fact, watch on youtube above). I hope you take the time to do so, and to share it with a friend. The images are haunting, but the lyrics will punch you in the gut. I was in tears by the third track.

…Source: The Secret Path

(Remembrance Day  greetings today to my friends and relatives in Canada.. Trace)

At age nine, Wenjack and three of his sisters were sent to Cecilia Jeffrey Indian Residential School, more than 600 km away, where he was given the name “Charlie.” On October 22, 1966 near Kenora, Ontario, Chanie Wenjack died when he walking home to the family he was taken from over 400 miles away.  Fifty years later, Tragically Hip frontman Gord Downie has taken Wenjack’s story and turned it into the Secret Path project, including a solo album, a graphic novel and an animated film. BACKGROUND on Chanie HERE

Wenjack has become a symbol of resistance to the power of colonization in Canada. In 1972, Indigenous students and members of Trent University’s Native Studies department lobbied for the university to name its newly built college after Wenjack.  Ultimately, a theatre in the college was named “Wenjack Theatre.”

Wenjack has inspired several artistic tributes, including the song “Charlie Wenjack” by Mi’kmaq artist Willie Dunn (1978) and the painting Little Charlie Wenjack’s Escape from Residential School by Anishinaabe artist Roy Kakegamic (2008). He has also inspired the creative works of author Joseph Boyden and filmmaker Terril Calder.

Suggested Reading

  • P. Bush,“Charlie Wenjack and the Indian Residential School System,” Presbyterian History vol. 58, no. 2 (2014): 4–5; J.S. Milloy, A National Crime: The Canadian Government and the Residential School System, 1879–1986 (1999); The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada,Honouring the Truth, Reconciling for the Future (2015).

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/CBCArtsWeb

CALLED HOME: The RoadMap | Why changing family patterns is our most important work

As we learned from the CDC-Kaiser Permanente ACE Study, negative childhood experiences are often kept secret, downplayed, or repressed because of our powerful desire to put such things behind us. Unfortunately, our minds and our brains don’t work that way. Patterns can play out automatically, no matter how hard we try to be original and create our own realities.

Just as it is important to know family medical history (e.g., diabetes or tuberculosis) it is equally important to know about our social inheritance.

…There is a chilling quote from Time magazine essayist Lance Morrow, from his ACES-informed book, Heart: “Generations are boxes within boxes; inside my mother’s violence you find another box, which contains my grandfather’s violence, and inside that box (I suspect but do not know) you would find another box with some such black secret energy—stories within stories, receding in time.”

Source: Parenting’s troubled history: Why changing family patterns is our most important work

****

By LT Hentz

Our job as humans is to connect the dots. I published this link on the ACE STUDY and learned about that important study while I was writing my memoir One Small Sacrifice.

What does it mean for an adoptee to be raised outside your ancestry and culture that isn’t white/American? I have some answers in this new anthology CALLED HOME: The RoadMap. [ ISBN-13:  978-0692700334 (Blue Hand Books) ]

Here’s an excerpt of the PREFACE

No matter who adopts us, new parents will never erase our blood, ancestry, DNA… or our dreams…

No matter how much I want to believe things have changed for the better in Indian Country and in our world, the reality is there is still an “adoption-land” waiting to scoop up more children and more children who need healthy moms and dads.  This anthology and this entire book series will be their roadmap.

This is why Patricia and I chose the title CALLED HOME for this anthology. Roadmap was added to the second edition you are now reading.

There are many adoptees called home, but very few are back living on tribal lands.  It’s a testament to the courage to be in reunion as adult adoptees, as survivors who were part of the government plans to rid the world of Indigenous and First Nation People.  Adoption didn’t kill our spirit but it hurt us deeply.

After ten years of researching the topic and history of adoption, sadly, states like South Dakota and South Carolina are still violating federal law called the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 when Native children are supposed to be placed with family, close kin, a relative, or with a different tribe.  “Stranger adoptions” with non-Indian parents is supposed to be the absolute last resort or rare occurrence.  However, it can still happen, you can read the chapter on Baby V.

Let’s face it: With a shortage of Native adoptive and foster homes in the US and Canada, children will be lost and later called Lost Birds, adoptees and Stolen Generations.  Indian Country as a whole is still impoverished, living with daily reminders of broken treaties, remote reservations, soul-crushing poverty, loss of land, shortages of language speakers, and generations who are dealing with post-traumatic stress after centuries of war, residential boarding school abuse, food scarcity and neglect.  Since so many are still subjected to Third World conditions, Indigenous children will continue to be taken and placed into foster care and adoptions.  (Wasn’t this the original plan to erase all Indians?)  Native American moms and dads can still lose their child (or all their children) in courtrooms of white privilege and cultural insensitivity.

On a visit to Brock University in 2014, my co-editor Patricia Busbee and I learned how foster and adoptive parents are invited to bring their Native child to First Nations Friendship Centres in the Niagara, Ontario area.  Children are invited to hear stories, learn their language and songs, while their new adoptive parents can participate in activities, too.  The entire family is welcome and nourished in this cultural exchange.

Indian Country needs to look to its northerly neighbors in Canada and start its own US-wide “Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC),” and reinvent and redesign its own child care protection systems for the sake of its own future generations.  Maine is the only state with a TRC.

After many adoptees contacted me wanting to find their first families, I can say with certainty adoptees are CALLED HOME, called in dreams to be reunited with family members and their many nations.  These adoptees do find a way to reconnect despite difficulties with archaic laws, a clueless public, biased lawmakers, closed adoptions, sealed court documents and falsified birth records.

It’s long overdue that North America opens their closed adoption files.  When this happens, if this happens, the entire world will finally comprehend how adoption was actually colonization and the trafficking of Indigenous Indian children by the “Nation Builders” who call themselves America and Canada.  We in North America are literally educated to be ignorant of the true history of our colonization, by the nation builders who use it and what really happened here.  Hiding it only perpetuates continued racism and intolerance.

The fog is lifting now and it’s time we shine a light on the hidden history of the Indian Adoption Projects and Programs like ARENA, the Indian Adoption Projects, Operation Papoose, Project Rainbow and the 60s Scoop.  You will read about these programs in this book.

For the writers in this book, adoption was the tool of assimilation, erasing our identity and sovereign rights as tribal citizens, intending it to be permanent.

For too many of us, states still won’t release our files to us, even as adults.  We have included a section in this book for adoptees who are still searching for clues after their closed adoptions.  Many adoptees are doing DNA tests with relatives and to find relatives..

As these books travel to new lands and new hands, I pray that adoptive parents accept that we cannot be the child they want us to be, or dream us to be, and that we are born with our own unique biology, ancestry and characteristics.  We will always dream in Indian.

ebook-cover-new
LINK

 

I’m reading | Raven Shadow | Hostile Architecture | Cyberbullies | Is Facebook Dying?

By Lara Trace (registered Independent voter)

Go on social media and not get somewhat depressed? Exactly! I watched Twitter instead of the Big Debate, for example. I want to gauge what others are thinking. My head still hurts. (Yelling out loud may help sometimes.)

Otherwise I cuddle up and read and crochet and do mosaic coloring so I keep very very calm. I know it’s theatrics and not politics.

Here is what I’m reading: (links provided)

Standing Firm at Standing Rock: Why the Struggle is Bigger Than One Pipeline

Native Musician and AWARD WINNER JOSH HALVERSON (Lakota) SELECTS ALICIA KEYS AS HIS COACH ON NBC’S THE VOICE: Josh Halverson (Mdewakantonwan Sioux) who won the Songwriter of the Year Award at the Native American Music Awards in 2013 for his Cd, One Shot, earned a last minute three-chair turn during The Voice Blind Auditions as his wife and young son, Thunderbird, watched backstage. Josh, who is a cattle rancher from Texas performed a haunting version of Bob Dylan’s “Forever Young”. Once Miley Cyrus, Alicia Keys, and Blake Sheldon hit their buttons, they all turned around to fight for Halverson. Although Blake brought out his best cattle talk, Halverson chose to join Team Alicia. [www.NAMALIVE.com]  I don’t watch the VOICE but I love Josh.

*** Lending an Ear(ring)

** Discrimination by DESIGN?

Industrial design plays a role as well, by steering human activities. For example, benches designed with prominent arm rests or shallow seats discourage homeless people from sleeping on them. This phenomenon is known as “hostile architecture” or more broadly, “unpleasant design.”

Benches designed to make sleeping impossible. (Denna Jones via Flickr, William Murphy via Flickr)

A notorious example: NY city planner Robert Moses designed a number of Long Island Parkway overpasses to be so low that buses could not drive under them. This effectively blocked Long Island from the poor and people of color who tend to rely more heavily on public transportation. And the low bridges continue to wreak havoc in other ways: 64 collisions were recorded in 2014 alone (here’s a bad one). READ HERE

***Aging out of Foster Care:

The Day I Age Out

Part Two: Fostering Independence

Part Three: Finding Home

 ***

Audrie & Daisy:

The Truth About Cyber-Bullying and Rape  (Jay, you really are amazing)

***UMass Assistant Prof Addresses Oppression of American Indians (read Rich’s blog!)

 
Joseph Blue Crow discovers why he has spent his life in the shadow of the raven. And now, for the first time, he feels able to walk the good red road. He will dedicate his life to recording the personal stories of the descendants of the Lakota people who died at Wounded Knee. In the light of truth, he says, may all heal. (I’m finishing up THE ROCK CHILD by Win Blevins now)
***Reanimating Kubrick in Operation Avalanche (this is so cool):

Kristen Lamb’s Blog:

Is Facebook Dying? What’s Killing It? (good stuff for my class)

What are you reading? Stolen Generations maybe?

p.s. I love reading all your blogs!!! (You can share this post anytime anywhere)

xoxoxox

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