Our Beloved Kin: King Philip’s War Informs Today’s Events

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“There have been many books about King Philip’s War but none like this. Our Beloved Kin is insightful and a better way to understand New England’s past.”—Colin G. Calloway, author of The Indian World of George Washington

Sokoki Sojourn

lisa brooks amherst our beloved kin

The story of King Philip’s War, which ended [340] years ago, may be central to the history of this place, marked in locations like King Philip’s Hill in Northfield, the Bloody Brook Battle monument in Deerfield, and even King Philip restaurant in Phillipston. The three-year armed conflict is largely blamed on attacks on colonial settlers by Wampanoags and other native “savages.”

But a book released this week by Amherst College associate professor Lisa Brooks, an Abenaki, depicts the prolonged war on a dozen settlements throughout much of the region as more complex. And it’s seen as the result of mistaken assumptions English settlers made about the native tribes.

What’s more, Lisa Brooks’ “Our Beloved Kin” (Yale University Press) is based on written letters and other materials written by those Indians, who are largely assumed to have been illiterate. And the creative, readable telling by this associate professor of English and…

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Lara/Trace

...mosaic artist ...author ...poet... blog consultant... kinda done as a book publisher

13 thoughts on “Our Beloved Kin: King Philip’s War Informs Today’s Events”

  1. Lara this brings to mind the recent PBS American Experience episode about Roosevelt in the Amazon exploring “The River of Doom” which in present day is still named Rio Roosevelt. His lead in the expedition was Brazilian Cândido Rondon. He met countless remote indigenous untouched tribes and took the approach of respect and humility. Without his wise approach, it is thought the whole expedition would have been attacked and perished.
    Peace

    Liked by 4 people

    1. I am reading The Dublin Seminar, a history series from 1991 that just began a new look at Native history, sources and New England tribes. We are slowly seeing a more revealing history of the colonization, KC. It hurts but we need to know.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. The way they treated King Philip’s people after his father had saved their butts, should have been a warning to all other Indian tribes. Don’t give them an inch as they will take a milek.
    J. Glenn Evans
    Poet Novelist and Political Activist

    Liked by 2 people

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