Invisible | Two Worlds 2nd Edition | Christmas Lift | Jingle Bells

Anna and her husband, Gene Sorrell, outside their home in Evaro, Mont. Anna eventually received follow-up care for her surgery, but the process took years.

Native Americans Feel Invisible In U.S. Health Care System

Listen

The life expectancy of Native Americans in some states is 20 years shorter than the national average – 20 years. There may be many factors in this and here’s one. About a quarter of Native Americans report experiencing discrimination when they go to a doctor or a health clinic. That’s a finding of a poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.  In the NPR poll, Native Americans who live in areas where they are in the majority reported experiencing prejudice at rates far higher than in areas where they constituted a minority.  In places where there are few American Indians, Moss says, “people don’t expect to see American Indians; they think they are from days gone by, and so you are misidentified. And that’s another form of discrimination.”

***

Memorial University of Newfoundland has the second highest number of Indigenous human remains, with 353 individuals, both complete and incomplete. Even though the Rooms Corporation — the home of the provincial museum — is responsible for the remains, they are housed at the university wrote Mark Ferguson, the manager of collections at the museum, in an email.  These Indigenous remains date as far back as 7,000 years ago. READ

By LT

Hi all! I just wrapped up the second edition of Two Worlds, Vol. 1 in the Lost Children book series. Whew! It took a long time. The first edition came out in 2012. There are new updated narratives and of course history, including the landmark decision in Canada to pay adoptees for pain and suffering after the 60s Scoop. The press release will soon be HERE.

And… I answer some questions about writing, blogging, spirituality and more at Jerry’s blog Oneness of Humanity.  Here is my interview.

Please check out the entire interview series… HERE

And here is a little Christmas Lift:

‘A Christmas lift’: holiday lines by Langston Hughes on view at Beinecke
Michael Morand, December 8, 2017, Yale News

What’s a poet with a large circle of friends, rich in words if limited in financial resources, to do when checking the names off his holiday list? For Langston Hughes, during the holiday season of 1950, the answer was to share some of his wit in homemade Christmas postcards.

The draft typescript for this and other cards in a set of Christmas greetings are among the extensive Langston Hughes Papers in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. The Hughes archives were given to Yale University by the renowned writer beginning in 1941, continuing throughout his lifetime, and including more materials from his estate upon his death in 1967.

The 1950 Hughes holiday cards are all on view in a special pop-up holiday display on the Beinecke Library’s mezzanine in temporary exhibition cases from Dec. 8-20. The Beinecke Library’s ground floor and mezzanine exhibition areas are free and open to the public seven days a week.    continue…

*** In the News

“Jingle Bells” History Takes Surprising Turn

Joel Brown, Dec. 8, 2016, BU Today

Kyna Hamill did not set out to debunk a cherished local myth about “Jingle Bells,” but the truth became a runaway sleigh.

At 19 High Street in Medford, Massachusetts, a plaque commemorates the spot where James Lord Pierpont (1822–1893) supposedly wrote the popular holiday song, inspired by sleigh races on Salem Street, while sitting in a tavern in 1850. Hamill, an assistant director and senior lecturer in the CAS Core Curriculum who also teaches in the CFA School of Theatre, became interested in the “Jingle Bells” story while working as a volunteer with the Medford Historical Society & Museum. “Every December, we’d get a call asking to do a story about ‘Jingle Bells,’” she says. “I would pull out the file, and it was a very easy story to tell. Reporters loved that it was written in Medford.”

Reporters also love conflict, and so they were thrilled to learn that the Medford tale is contested by people in Savannah, Georgia, where Pierpont is buried. The southerners insist that Pierpont wrote the jaunty winter anthem in that city, in late 1857, and led the first “Jingle Bells” singalong in a local church where his brother was pastor.   continue…

Peace on Earth is all I want this holiday season… xoxox Lara/Trace

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14 thoughts on “Invisible | Two Worlds 2nd Edition | Christmas Lift | Jingle Bells

  1. Up here, accessibility can be a huge barrier to medical access, let alone racism when they get there. Every day I talk to folks who are in such remote communities they have to take a plane just to visit a dentist. Our health care is socialized but that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s an even playing field.

    Can’t wait to check out your new book!!

    Liked by 3 people

  2. I enjoyed the interview, which told me a great deal more about your background.

    The US health care system is a poor excuse for something with that name. It is designed to benefit drug companies, and the private doctors and hospitals. As you clearly state, it is also open to abuse, corruption, racism, and exploitation. Makes me feel privileged to have the National Health Service in the UK.

    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Epidemiologists have known for at least two decades that life expectancy decreases with inequality. The best predictor of a person’s lifelong physical/mental health (including life expectancy) is the mother’s income at their time of birth. Epigenetic research shows low income is associated with high stress hormone levels during pregnancy, which has a direct effect on how gene expression for insulin metabolism and immunity are set (and probably a whole lot of functions we don’t about yet).

    Liked by 2 people

  4. If my hotel experience told me anything, it is that Natives ARE invisible because far too many of us are surprised to discover there are any who are still alive… Guess that is what happens when we start reinventing history and get carried away with our own self-importance. But as any medicine person can tell us, just because something is not seen doesn’t mean it is not there, formidable, and deserving of due respect.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Valuable reporting, Lara/Trace!
    during my Indian Health Service career
    I received the same care as other patients
    and found it adequate and compassionate.
    However, services varied by hospital and many
    as you point out, do not get the care they need.
    wishing you a happy, restful, jingly holiday 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Pingback: Turkey File

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