Lynching in American Art | Indigenous knowledge in the classroom | Symbols of Conquest | Reflections of Monday Night Football and Las Vegas

The Legacy of Lynching is a collaboration between the museum and the nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative, presenting racial histories we’ve long been asleep to.

“Our silence is creating a burden,” said civil rights attorney Bryan Stevenson at the launch of The Legacy of Lynching: Confronting Racial Terror in America at the Brooklyn Museum. “We’ve got to do something to get closer to freedom, and that means talking about some things we haven’t talked about.” The exhibit, which runs through October 8, is a collaboration between the museum and Stevenson’s nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative (EJI), and it reckons with racial histories we’ve long been asleep to.

It’s striking to find no explicit photographs — no horror images, for instance, of police handcuffs on lynching victims’ wrists — at The Legacy of Lynching, a choice the curators made to approach the topic respectfully, according to the Brooklyn Museum website. It’s a haunting absence, one that resists the spectacle that has historically conferred lynching with such power. Yet The Legacy of Lynching comes at a time when subtlety barely perks the ears of those who most need to hear and understand. Today, resurgent white nationalists are rehearsing their own unsubtle symbols, from the casually placed noose to the tightly clutched torch. One wonders whether we need stronger historical images as a counterpoint.

“They took off the white robe and put on the black robe,” says Hinton. With EJI’s legal assistance, he was exonerated after 30 years in prison.

The Legacy of Lynching: Confronting Racial Terror in America continues at the Brooklyn Museum (200 Eastern Pkwy, Prospect Heights, Brooklyn) through October 8. 

SOURCE

****

“What have we failed to know and at what cost?” An education professor draws upon Indigenous literature to support a personal journey into classroom decolonization. (Top Photo)

READ: How I am learning to include Indigenous knowledge in the classroom

 

 

 

 

Last night on Monday Night Football, one team came out of the tunnel with a racist mascot on their jerseys and helmets, and the other team’s fans were mimicking throwing tomahawks and singing some sort of pathetic war whoop. Both of the teams’ owners seemed fine with it. No one in the broadcast booth said anything. There were no tweets from President Trump about it. And all of the sponsors and advertisers like GMC, Geico, several beer companies and many other mainstream corporations (both foreign and domestic) gladly hawked their wares throughout the entire event.

This all happened less than 24 hours after a white guy shot his fully automatic weapon into a crowd of people, killing at least 59 people and injuring 527 in a horribly evil and incredibly tragic event in Las Vegas. But throughout the day most news organizations referred to this shooting as the deadliest mass shooting in the history of America.

Apparently, the media forgot about the massacre at Wounded Knee, which left 350 dead, or the massacre at Sand Creek which killed nearly 200 men, women, and children from the Cheyenne and Arapahoe tribes. Or perhaps they only meant massacres for which the U.S. Congress DIDN’T award Congressional Medals of Honor.

GOOD READ: Reflections of Monday Night Football and Las Vegas – Native News Online

Gun violence kills about 90 people every day in the United States, a toll measured in wasted and ruined lives and with an annual economic price tag exceeding $200 billion. For many years, scholars have explored the possible ties between mental illness and violence. They have found that most people with a serious mental illness are not violent, that mental illness is not a strong risk factor for homicide. READ MORE

Tom Petty wished he hadn’t used Confederate flag on 1985 tour (click)Late rock icon Tom Petty once admitted he wished he hadn’t featured a Confederate flag at past concerts — 30 years after he prominently displayed the controversial Southern symbol throughout his 1985 tour.

The Gainesville, Fla., native — who died Monday at 66, a day after going into cardiac arrest — told Rolling Stone in 2015 that he regretted using the flag during shows on his “Southern Accents” tour, contending he was “ignorant” about its true meaning.

Some look at the flag, which was flown by the South during the Civil War, as a symbol of racism.

“The Confederate flag was the wallpaper of the South when I was a kid growing up in Gainesville, Florida. I always knew it had to do with the Civil War, but the South had adopted it as its logo,” he told the music outlet shortly after South Carolina officials opted to remove the flag from their statehouse.

Tom Petty’s death draws attention to dangers of cardiac arrest

So much news, so much tragedy, so much history… Be well my friends. Hug your children.  Rest in Peace Harry and Tom. Lara/Trace

Advertisements

14 thoughts on “Lynching in American Art | Indigenous knowledge in the classroom | Symbols of Conquest | Reflections of Monday Night Football and Las Vegas

  1. I can understand how the recent shooting in Nevada may seem to have been overstated, in an historical context. After the 1996 Dunblane killing here, that changed UK gun laws, many forgot about the mass murders of Scottish people after 1745, by the English Army. But as a ‘single-shooter’ atrocity, it was our worst, and did radically change things. The Nevada shooting has forced the Second Amendment back into the news, but I fear it is unlikely to be repealed.

    The history of the lynchings in the USA is a tragic legacy, and one that is rightly remembered.The exhibition looks powerful, and reminds us how recently these things were happening; during my own youth in fact.

    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I love your blog because it is important for everyone and also important specifically to each of us in different ways. Growing up I knew everything about my Swedish heritage, I even learned to speak Swedish but I didn’t know anything about my equal Cherokee heritage. All I knew growing up was my dad looked a lot like old photos of Chief Sitting Bull and his parents looked quintessentially Cherokee. Because of lifelong Vision issues I have had way more than my share of retina examinations and on many occasions the doctor would say,You’re Native American, aren’t you??” when I asked how they could tell from looking at my retina they would say, “It’s not your retina, your eye color is uniquely Native American.” I have to admit that I never really had the temperament or personality of the swedes in my family and my Cherokee family knew nothing about their heritage and didn’t want to talk about it. I once tried to get some family information out of a great-uncle and he said to me, “All of that Indian talk It’s just a rumor.” I know that all of this denial was racially-based bias which is common in Alabama. over the years I have uncovered the turn that my father’s family tree takes directly into the Cherokee Nation on both his mother AND father side.
    During the the time just prior to The Trail of Tears my Cherokee ancestors successfully assimilated into white Alabama Society avoiding Roundup and at the same time blocking my genealogy research but I won’t give up. LOL! I no longer wonder how I got the nickname “Buffalo”👍👊

    Liked by 1 person

      1. one of my friends has been attending a genealogy and DNA seminar series at our local community center and she called me up unable to stop laughing… It seems they got the results of their DNA screenings and several of the racist rednecks had African American and Native American roots. hahahahaha! I’m thinking about doing a post on it.👍👊

        Like

  3. We seem to hold endless fascination with the behavior of people we can divorce from our own culpability. As long as a mass shooter is crazy, we can revel in the sordid details of his (or her) crimes and do little or nothing to prevent the next time. Why is the NRA willing to check sales of bump stocks? Because creating the same gun action is possible without manufacturing a salable part the same way a bomb can be built off an internet recipe. They lose nothing, they sacrifice nothing.

    Next will come the books, the movies, the rehashing of conflicting detail. This way, we can overlook events like Wounded Knee, which we can hide under the carpet of war — choosing to honor intent or belief over fact or deed. We decide that acknowledging an historic misstep is equivalent to condemning our ancestors, never willing to admit that we have built our entire country on fruit from the poisonous tree… How can we possibly heal the wounds we keep inflicting on each other without admitting mistakes and misjudgments were made — sometimes intentionally and in the same way some of us right now are sacrificed for the happiness, wealth, and unchecked power of others? How many of us can look at our own lives and see the lie, the cheat, the steal of our own futures? And then why can we not admit that these same character traits have existed throughout history — tricking, coercing, and convincing all of us that whole peoples are not worthy of our respect? How many of us have died or lived mortally wounded lives so THEY might prosper from our sacrifice? Do you hear an alarm clock ringing somewhere?

    The whole sports team naming issue defies rationality. The tighter people cling to their explanation that such is a COMPLIMENT to Native Peoples is revealing itself as the pure RACISM it is. The matter is indefensible. Period. Any name used as a predicate to pulling a trigger or swatting the back end of a horse is nothing BUT racist, offensive and part of a shameful past. If it isn’t and would simply “cost too much to change the name,” then let’s make the mascot a white redneck. Now THERE’S a real redskin. But somehow, I doubt the change will catch favor. And if Redskin fans say “because it would be racist”… then perhaps there is hope for them after all. But at the moment, I am thinking not.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. How can we possibly heal the wounds we keep inflicting on each other without admitting mistakes and misjudgments were made — sometimes intentionally and in the same way some of us right now are sacrificed for the happiness, wealth, and unchecked power of others? How many of us can look at our own lives and see the lie, the cheat, the steal of our own futures? And then why can we not admit that these same character traits have existed throughout history — tricking, coercing, and convincing all of us that whole peoples are not worthy of our respect? How many of us have died or lived mortally wounded lives so THEY might prosper from our sacrifice? Do you hear an alarm clock ringing somewhere?
    This is brilliance, KC.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. It is all about ignorance, Lara. As in “ignore-ance”. What is too difficult or painful, so many people just turn a blind eye and a deaf ear to. Truthfully I never realized how many common symbols that I grew up with are really insulting. I never meant them that way nor did my parents; but now that I do know I would never display them again. Of course, it isn’t really my issue because I don’t like displaying logos, flying flags or embracing anything which causes separation. It is the main reason I don’t participate in particular religious practice. I enjoy my own relationship with Mother, Father, Spirit. It needs no definition. We are all dreaming and some have chosen to live a nightmare.

    Liked by 1 person

Let's discuss!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s