In the News · Indian Country · Native Americans

After Dakota Access Pipeline Protests, Army Corps Blocks Final Permit, Will Explore Other Routes

The Army Corps of Engineers says it’s denying a permit for building the oil pipeline right above the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. The move comes after months of protests.

Source: After Dakota Access Pipeline Protests, Army Corps Blocks Final Permit, Will Explore Other Routes : The Two-Way : NPR

Top Photo: Veterans from across America from all branches of the United State military celebrated with water protectors on Tuesday afternoon this week.

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19 thoughts on “After Dakota Access Pipeline Protests, Army Corps Blocks Final Permit, Will Explore Other Routes

      1. But what a great accomplishment this is, to have stood against this great evil and forced it to consider an alternative. There is hope in what these people have done. We the people (humanity) have powers far beyond this evil, which rules for now.

        Liked by 1 person

      1. And from the standpoint of the business interests in this whole affair, here, it seems to me, is the nub of the matter:

        Energy Transfer Partnership admitted in court documents that it is under contract to have the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) finished by January 1, 2017. The contracts, with their buyers, assure Energy Transfer Partnership 2014 prices. If the pipeline is not finished in time, the buyers have the right to renegotiate the price of the crude.

        I mean apart from the fact that the activists are fighting a just cause, which they most definitely are, if you were the on the “buyers” side of the contract with ETP, either directly or indirectly implicated, wouldn’t you, at this juncture, be “with” the protest?

        More is happening behind the scenes than we know, I suspect, given the magnitude of the profits and losses at hand, with the profits of one side of the contract being the losses of the other. Yes, I’m suggesting that the protest may part of a stratagem unknown even to the activists themselves, who may be pawns in a bigger or stealthier game.

        I mean, did the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe only just recently wake up to the reality of the pipeline? If not, why is the fight only just now coming to a head?

        Something smells like attempted extortion, to me. I don’t mean by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe or the anyone directly involved in the protetest, but by elements who have a clear interest in threatening ETP with the complete loss of its investment and who had the means to foment opposition. If this were the case, one might expect that once the behind the scenes actors come to an “arrangement,” that indeed “[t]he likelihood an environmental impact statement will ever happen for the Dakota Access Pipeline [will be] basically none.,” and that the protest action will be circumvented or subverted somehow.

        There is more to this story than meets the eye, I suspect. It would be interesting to have someone map out the possible interconnections between ETP’s “buyers,” or even other indirect “players,” that and the evolution of the mobilization of the protest. Of course, there may be nothing at all to this suspicion of mine, and the article you reference, DAPL is Not Dead, nicely touches upon all of the relevant factors. On the other hand, if one were looking a bit beyond these horizons, a nice hint of where the possible “extortion” is emanating from actually finds adequate expression in the last several paragraphs of that self-same article.

        Liked by 1 person

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