Redress for Slavery?

In the News

Pressure grows for compensation for the Caribbean trade

The Economist

Oct 5th 2013 | PORT OF SPAIN

LAST month Rodney Leon, a Haitian-American architect, won a competition for a memorial to victims of the slave trade. His white marble “Ark of Return”, shaped somewhat like a paper boat, will stand outside the UN headquarters in New York. Inside the building, some Caribbean leaders have used their annual General Assembly speaking slots to call for financial compensation for this great wrong. “We have recently seen a number of leaders apologising,” said the prime minister of Antigua and Barbuda, Baldwin Spencer. They should now “match their words with concrete and material benefits”.

Britain ended its slave trade in 1807, and freed the slaves in its Caribbean colonies by 1838. The British government borrowed £20m, then around 40% of the budget, to meet 47,000 claims for loss of human property. The former slaves got nothing.

Close to two centuries on, Caribbean politicians want redress. The Caribbean Community (Caricom) which links former British colonies with Suriname and Haiti, established an official reparations commission in July and has approached a British legal firm, Leigh Day, for advice.

Read more: http://www.economist.com/news/americas/21587236-pressure-grows-compensation-caribbean-trade-blood-money

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Slavery descendants in coastal Georgia communities fight tax hikes, threats to their ancestral homes

Tuesday, October 1, 2013, 10:15 AM

DARIEN, Ga. – Residents of one of the few remaining Gullah-Geechee communities on the Southeast coast opened new appeals Monday against soaring property values that brought them big tax hikes, fearful they could be forced off lands their families have owned since their ancestors were freed from slavery.

The African-American residents of the tiny Hog Hammock community on Georgia’s Sapelo Island got sticker shock last year when steep increases in their property values saddled them with whopping tax bills.

Skyrocketing appraisals and tax bills come amid pressure from affluent mainland buyers driving up land values while seeking property along or near the Atlantic coast. But critics say the increasing tax burden violates protections enacted to help preserve the island’s indigenous inhabitants.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/slave-descendants-georgia-fight-tax-hikes-ancestral-homes-article-1.1472517#ixzz2h2jzfSw3

LINKS: tiny horrorsRead this: https://laratracehentz.wordpress.com/2013/02/15/tiny-horrors/

Should Native Americans be compensated for atrocities too?  If you deny it happened in America, then who will lead the charge for genocide in America?

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